Ultimate Voltron by Super7

I did some reorganizing in the closets this weekend and found some stuff that I never got around to reviewing and set aside a small stack of goodies. Among that pile is Super7’s stab at creating a stylized and articulated 7-inch version of the Legendary Defender of the Universe, Voltron, for their Ultimates line!

Everything about this packaging screams premium! You get classy angled edges and a swank glossy black sleeve with foil lightning bolts surrounding a foil Coat of Arms. Lifting off the sleeve reveals a foil window box with Voltron and his accessories filling out the inner tray quite nicely! The rainbow Voltron logo is situated below the figure and the back of the package has the opening narration of the cartoon series. Everything is collector friendly, and that’s a wonderful thing, because this is a figure I intend to display in the packaging. Let’s get him out and have a look!

Obviously, this is a Voltron figure that does not separate, which allows for creating a sculpt with all the stylish flare of the big robot’s animated appearance. And I’m happy to say that Super7 took full advantage of it! The limbs are devoid of the more unsightly lion kibble, with those details softened and blended into the robot. The arms are a bit more rounded, while the legs are left more boxy. Meanwhile, the torso is perfectly proportioned. And while the goal here was to create a simpler and more animated look, there’s still plenty of nice detail, particularly in the lower legs, the “belt,” the chest crest, and of course the head sculpt. Along with a solid sculpt, the colors are vibrant with a mix of metallic and matte finishes to offer some nice contrast.

Unfortunately, as I really started to scrutinize the figure, the cracks in the foundation began to show themselves. There are some weird imperfections in the plastic, like creases and blemishes showing some problems with the molding process. Likewise, the paint application shows a lot of inconsistencies. It’s sharp in some areas, messy in others. There are a number of flubbed areas where brush strokes and swirls can be seen. No single one of these nitpicks is terrible, but when they all form together, the figure just doesn’t stand up to careful inspection.

But where this figure really flops is in the articulation. Now, Super7 is a stand up company, so I wouldn’t be surprised if they did a complete run down on the articulation when they solicited it. But, I bought mine from an online retailer, which simply listed it as Super Articulated. What I got was profoundly disappointing. The arms have rotating hinges in the shoulders, there are swivels in the biceps, hinges in the elbows, and rotating hinges in the wrists. All that is pretty good, although the shoulders tend to look rather awkward when angled out. It’s the legs that really hurt the figure. The hips have front and back rotation, and that’s it. No lateral movement at all. The figure is sculpted with a bit of a wide stance, but again… that’s it. The knees are hinged. You do get rotation in the waist and the neck. Voltron can achieve some decent looking modest poses for display, but sadly I did not find him to be a fun figure to play around with.

As for accessories, you get two extra hands, with the lions’ mouths open. Why Super7 didn’t just hinge the mouths is beyond me. Maybe they felt the hinge wouldn’t hold the accessories well, and that’s fair enough. The regular lion hands have soft mouths to grip the accessories pretty strongly.

Naturally, Voltron comes with his Blazing Sword and Shield and these accessories are absolutely gorgeous! The sculpts are great and they are actually vac metalized so they have stunning silver finishes. As mentioned, the grippy lion head hands hold them extremely well, although the joints in the shoulders and elbows aren’t always up to the task to hold their weight for long.

And finally, you also get a Summoning version of the Blazing Sword with a blue hilt and a glow-in-the-dark blade. Necessary? Nope! But it sure is a heck of a nice bonus!

I was really excited to finally open this figure, but I’m sorry to say it did not live up to my expectations. You get some stellar packaging and a figure that looks pretty good just standing on the shelf, but I found him to be frustrating to pose in any meaningful manner, and in severe need of some lateral hinges in those hips. Added to that, the strange imperfections in the molding, and some sloppy paint just doesn’t reflect the $45 price tag. There’s definitely some stuff to like here, but not enough to make this a happy purchase.

ReAction Star Trek: The Next Generation (Wave One) by Super7

Playmates just announced a return to making Star Trek figures, and while I fear that line will be populated by stuff from the grim-dark, depressing, dystopian shit that is Discovery and Picard, it’ll certainly be worth a look. But it wasn’t too long ago that Super7 announced that they had secured the license to The Next Generation and that got me more excited! I don’t think a week ever passes me by without watching at least one episode of Star Trek. It will forever be my Go-To show when I want to put something on to relax or watch something while I’m having dinner. No, it’s not always The Next Generation, but that one remains one of my all-time great comfort shows. So, when Super7 announced they were adding TNG to their ReAction series, I smiled and said Make it So!

Now, I say in the title Wave One, but I bought an extra Borg Drone instead of Guinan, so I was fibbing just a little bit. The others include Picard, Data, Worf, and Wesley Crusher. If you’re keeping score, this is the second time ReAction and Star Trek teamed up, but the first time it was Funko doing Classic Trek, and well, they weren’t very good. I had high hopes for these, however, as I’ve been enjoying most of Super7’s ReAction lines. Transformers, Alien, ThunderCats, Jem, I’ve been buying a lot of them. Most of those I’ve chosen to keep carded, but I decided to open this TNG line, mainly because I want to be able to crew my Shuttlecraft Galileo from Galoob’s old line, and it’s just not compatible with the totes and totes of Playmates Trek figures I have.

I dig the cards a lot. They are personalized with some great character art on the front, set against a snappy silver foil Delta symbol. The backdrop features the multi-colored star streaks with The Enterprise at warp, and the familiar title logo is at the top. The figures are on trays, so they don’t rattle around in their little bubble coffins, which is always a plus. The back of each card has a little blurb about the character, and oddly enough Star Trek is written in the Classic font at the top. It also features the standard ship’s computer LCARS display, which is really cool. Finally, you also get a Collect Them All style look at all six figures available in this wave. It’s not a bad assortment, but I would have preferred another alien instead of Guinan. Maybe a Romulan or Ferengi.

Straightaway, the Enterprise crew all share the same body, which is fine for some and a bummer for others. I have no problem with Data and Picard sharing a body, but Worf should have been bigger. Yeah, he is very slightly taller, but only because of his big head. The uniforms are modeled after the later seasons, with the tunic and trousers as opposed to the S1 jumpsuits, and that was probably a good choice. I dig that the patterns on the tunic are actually part of the sculpt, and the tiny comm-badges look good. Oh yeah, the rank pips on the collar are different sculpts. As always, these ReAction figures feature the old style five points of articulation. I like that the T-crotch doesn’t cause their legs to spread like they did on the Playmates figures. Ironically, these might actually be more compatible with the Playmates Bridge Playset than the Playmates figures were!

Wesley features a newly sculpted torso and arms for his fashionable sweater, although they cheaped out by giving him the same legs as the uniformed figures, so he’s as tall as Worf and kind of lame. The Borg is the only figure among these that uses a completely unique sculpt, and they did a beautiful job on him. Sure, it’s simplified design to match the retro style, but it still looks great, with tubes and implants all over. I think I actually like this one more than the Playmates Borg.

The head sculpts range from pretty good to outright fantastic. I think Picard’s is the weakest, but not terrible. I think the smile is a little uncharacteristic, as he tends to come across as a little stodgy and dour a lot of the time. Still, I dig it.

Data’s is second from the bottom, but again decent. The yellow eyes are a nice touch. When you punch in this close with the camera, the paint tends to look sloppy, but it’s not something that’s noticeable with the figure in hand. And at least his face isn’t bizarrely speckled like Galoob’s first Data!

Wesley’s is surprisingly good for being so simple. A lot of the likeness is conveyed in the hair sculpt, but the facial features are pretty good too, especially the shape of the mouth.

Worf comes out on top among the Enterprise crew. Holy shit, this is a phenomenal sculpt for a 3 3/4-inch retro line. Sure, they had the most to work with here, but the detail is still exceptional. They also managed to refrain from giving him a giant bobble head. I should also mention here that Worf’s baldric is sculpted separately and worn by the figure. That’s one of the few advantages of Super7 recycling the same body, because it looks great.

The Borg is on par with Worf as just having a fantastic portrait. Again, they had a lot to work with here, but it turned out fantastic. The Borgified part of his head is actually sculpted separately and attached to the head.

I hope you don’t like accessories, because half the figures in this wave come with bupkis, and the ones that do all come with the same one! Wesley and the Borg get nothing and the others get the same phaser. Now, in fairness, the phaser is incredibly detailed for such a tiny accessory. They can hold it pretty well, although they have to have their arms lowered to have it pointed straight out to shoot. But hey, that’s better than sculpting it into their hands like Galoob did back in the day!

So, here’s the deal. At $18 a pop, Super7’s ReAction figures are expensive for what they are. But their past lines like ThunderCats and Transformers have justified the cost to me with gorgeous card artwork and excellent unique sculpts. They’re just cool What If? lines to me and fun to collect and display. That’s not the case here. The Next Generation already had its turn at 3 3/4-inch and 4-inch figures, making these less a cool curiosity and more of a Here We Go Again! The cards look good, but I didn’t shed a tear when I was ripping into them. And while the figures look good, this wave features too much parts recycling to justify the cost. I like the phasers, but these really needed a few more extras. A tricorder with Data? A bat’leth with Worf? Maybe a PADD with Picard? Keep in mind, with shipping these set me back $120. That’s insane! I had no problem spending that for past ReAction waves, but the value just isn’t’ there on these. I don’t know if the cost of acquiring the license required cut backs, but with CBS/Paramount running the franchise into the ground, it couldn’t have been that expensive to get. Even McFarlane walked away from it just a year or so ago. Even still, with half the wave sharing the same body, these should have been no more than $10-15 a pop. Will I buy any more? It depends on what they show for Wave Two. Or more to the point, if there is a Wave Two! That’s all I have to say about the figures… so feel free to dip out now, but for anyone interested, I’m going to see how these work with…

The Galoob Shuttlecraft Galileo! I don’t have any loose figures to go with this beauty, because all my Galoob figures are carded, but they were the same scale as ReAction and not stylized like the Playmates line, so let’s see how they do!

The shuttle is definitely undersized, but that was the case with the Galoob figures as well. But they certainly fit well in the vehicle. The box claims this thing holds six figures, but I’ve always called bullshit on that. It comfortably seats four, with two in the cockpit and two in the back cargo area. Where are the other two supposed to go? Maybe if you pull them apart it would work, but it always seemed like a fascicle claim to me.

I always liked this original TNG shuttle design and I was sorry when they dumped it. Although the replacement isn’t bad and Playmates did an excellent job on that one. As a toy, Galoob’s Galileo ain’t so great, but I do adore it as a curiosity. There’s no electronics, the sides of the nacelles are detailed with stickers, which never stay on, and the Pop Up Sensor Unit and Slide-Out Phaser Cannon are kind of underwhelming. It’s not a cheap toy to get nowadays, so I can’t really recommend hunting one down. Still, it’s nice to finally have some figures to go in it!

ReAction ThunderCats (Wave Two) by Super7

The good news is, I’m actually here on a Wednesday with some midweek content. The bad news is it’s a quick and dirty look at some packaged figures that I won’t be opening. For the record, I’m really enjoying lots of different licenses from Super7’s ReAction line, and they are to date the only figures I collect with the intent to keep them carded. I love some of these lines so much, I just want to share them even though I’m not playing around with them and delivering a full on review. At the same time, it’s frustrating because I want to tear them open and play with them. But ultimately, I think more than half the charm of these releases lie in the packaging and overall presentation. On the other hand, if Super7 wants to get me to buy doubles and open them, all they need to do is release a Cat’s Lair and some vehicles, and I’d have no choice! And then I’m reminded that I’m still making the toy equivalent of car payments on that Ultimate Thunder Tank.

Anywho, as you can tell by the title, this is the second wave of ThunderCats ReAction figures and I’m starting off with a shot of the back of the card’s “Collect Them All!” panel to show what figures were included in the previous wave. Or you can just check out my review for the complete rundown. For the uninitiated, ReAction figures are basically old school 5-Points of Articulation figures patterned after the old Kenner stuff. It’s basically a big What If? or What Could Have Been? Funko had the ReAction license for a while, and while some of them were decent, like the Universal Monsters, most were just crap. Super7 has been making out a lot better, and I own far more of these than I have shown off here. I really have to fix that!

The first assortment gave us Lion-O, Panthro, and Cheetara, and this one delivers on the final adult ThunderCat, Tygra. The character art for each of the previous ThunderCats has been nothing short of fantastic, and Tygra’s card isn’t going to upset that winning streak. I particularly love the way his bolo whip disappears behind the bubble, leaves the card, and reemerges. As with the previous wave, the figures are nested in trays inside the bubbles so they don’t rattle around in there. The body sculpt here is a bit soft, but that fits in with the animated look. The portrait, on the other hand is excellent. They really captured Tygra’s look perfectly, and all the paint is nice and clean. Tygra’s bolo whip is actually made of string and has a plastic handle and plastic balls on the end. Will Wilykit and Wilykat be a two-pack in the next wave? My guess is that they’ll be single-packed with their hoverboards. But what about faithful old Snarf? Will he get a card of his own? Only time will tell!

We got two Evil Mutants in the first wave, Slithe and Jackalman. This time, Monkian joins the team of baddies! I’m fine with that, but poor Vultureman seems to never get any love these days. Hopefully we’ll see him in Wave Three! Monkian is a solid figure, but his head sculpt isn’t quite all that I hoped it would be. I don’t think it’s bad for this style of figure, but I think Jackalman made out a lot better. I will say the detail in the mouth is pretty well done for the scale. The card art, on the other hand, is much better than we got for Jackalman. Monkian comes with his spiked flail, and the ball is actually connected to the handle with a chain, which is totally rad!

The first wave gave us powered up Mumm-Ra, so here we get withered old Mummy Mumm-Ra. This figure was probably a lot more difficult to do, because of the robes. Naturally, they took the old school Kenner route by sculpting the robes as part of each leg and it works well here. The bandages are a little too neatly sculpted, but I think they probably did the best they could given the scale and simple style of the figure. I do like the head sculpt and the way the hood hangs over the face a bit. Mumm-Ra comes with his staff and it looks pretty good. I started with these three figures, because I think they were all a given for this wave. The rest are surprises of varying degrees.

First up is Jaga, and I think this was the least surprising. Jaga is a pretty big deal in the cartoon and he appears in a lot of episodes, especially for someone who’s killed in the premier! I like this figure a lot. Once again the body is fairly simple but fits the animated look. The little studs on his wrist cuffs are a nice touch, as are the sculpted tops of his boots. The head sculpt is a great match for his cartoon counterpart as well. The cape is vinyl, but I thought it interesting that they didn’t go the Kenner route and attach it with shoulder loops. Instead it hangs around his neck. I’m not sure how the shape will hold up once he’s out of the package, and I may never know! Jaga comes with a pretty generic looking sword. I think it’s safe to say we’ll be seeing a translucent spirit version of Jaga in the near future. In fact, I’d bet a cartload of Thundrillium on it!

The penultimate figure here is Grune and he gets the dubious prize of being my least favorite figure in this assortment. I was just never a big fan of this character in the original series. I liked him a little better in the 2011 reboot, but still not a whole lot. I think this figure looks OK. The shoulder armor is well done, and I really dig his mace, but that’s about it. His portrait isn’t bad and certainly shows off some pretty good detail for the style and scale. I’m not a fan of the card art on this one, either. He looks goofy and deranged. Not a total dud, but definitely bottom of my list so far.

And that brings us to the biggest surprise of the assortment, both literally and figuratively. I would never have guessed we’d see Snowman of Hook Mountain so early in this line, and yet here he is. And he’s quite spectacular! He’s a chunky guy, and in that sense, he kind of mirrors Slithe from the first wave as being bigger proportioned than the rest. I think they absolutely nailed this figure. He looks great, the colors are perfect, and I really love the card art. He comes with a spear and even his helmet, which is suspended off to the side of the bubble. My only gripe here is that they missed an opportunity to release him with Snowmeow, similar to the He-Man/Skeletor with BattleCat/Panthor that they gave us in the Masters of the Universe ReAction line. Yeah, that might have been more than they wanted to invest in the character, but it would have been cool.

And there you have it. Another six figures, and I’m quite pleased with what we got. These are going in clamshell protectors and eventually they will be hung on my wall along with the first wave. It’s killing me not to open them, but every time I’ve opened ReAction figures in the past, I’ve regretted it. And unfortunately, the pricing on these, about $18 a pop, makes me unlikely to run out and pick up doubles. Unless of course those vehicles and playsets get announced. Then all bets are off. Will there be a third wave? God, I hope so! We definitely need Vultureman and the Thunder Kittens. We need Snarf in some form. And they need to start digging into the Berserkers. Let’s get Willa and some Warrior Maidens! Lets get Lynxana and Mandora! Oh, I could go on and on!

ReAction ThunderCats (Wave One) by Super7

Why do I love collecting ThunderCats so much? It probably has to do with it being one of the few 80’s toy properties where I watched the cartoon religiously but never had any of the toys. I guess maybe I’m making up for lost time? And here comes Super7 to help me stoke that plastic furnace of thunder kitty love! I should just start a new recurring feature called Mint on Card by Super7, because I have been picking up a lot of their ReAction figures lately, and these remain the only figures I buy with the intent of leaving them carded. I realize that Mint on Card reviews aren’t terribly exciting. And believe me, if they weren’t so expensive, I’d be grabbing doubles of these figures to open, but at $18-20 a pop, that’s not going to happen unless they go on clearance somewhere. Anywho, Super7 has been hard at work keeping the ThunderCats Classics line they acquired from Mattel going, but they’ve also given us this little snack to tide us over in the form of ReAction ThunderCats!

For the uninitiated, the ReAction line takes various properties and converts them into retro-style figures similar to Kenner’s Star Wars line. This practice had varying degrees of success in the hands of Funko, but now that Super7 has taken over, the results have been a lot more even. The first wave of ThunderCats consists of six figures and it’s a satisfying mix of both Cats and Mutants. The assortment includes Panthro, Jackalman, Slithe, Cheetara, Mumm-Ra in his powered up form, and Lion-O. It’s a solid assortment, unless you happen to be a Tygra fanboy, and then you’re shit out of luck until the next wave. As always, these figures feature five points of articulation each and come carded on beautiful retro-style packaging, which is decidedly not collector friendly. The back of the cards all feature the same Collect Them All photo of all the figures in the wave. Let’s start out with a look at the Cats!

You can’t have a first wave of ThunderCats without Lion-O, The Lord of the ThunderCats! Also, I think Cheetara was a fine choice, because she often gets pushed to later releases so it’s nice to see her out front and center. And Panthro is the third to round out this trio. So, assuming we’re going to get single carded releases of the Thunder Kittens, this wave splits the team of heroic kitties right down the middle, leaving WilyKit, WilyKat, and Tygra for the second assortment. What about Snarf? Honestly, I would have expected him to be included with Lion-O as an accessory, but it’s probably not out of the question to get him as a single carded release. We’ve seen ReAction figures as small as Gizmo from Gremlins released in the past. But before getting into the figures, let me take a moment to gush all over these cardbacks, because they are indeed gorgeous.

I think Funko’s biggest misstep with ReAction was saving money by using a single generic card for each series. It was a missed opportunity to exploit the potential of the whole retro-carded formula. Super7 recognized the value in collecting these figures as showpieces, making the card itself almost as important as the figure. As a result, the art for each of the characters is unique, dynamic, and exciting with the characters spilling out over the borders of the cards as if they’re coming right at you. Almost like these ThunderCats are loose! Lion-O strikes his iconic pose, Panthro looks like he’s ready to put the beat down on some dirty Mutants, and Cheetara is just looking sexy as all hell. Meow! All of the cards feature the beautiful ThunderCats logo emblazoned across the top and the Kenner-style ReAction logo in the bottom right hand corner. My only complaint here is that Super7 really should have credited the artist on the back of the card. It just feels like that’s a major part of what makes these so collectible.

The figures are fitted into trays inside the bubbles ensuring they’re accessories stay put and the Cats are always in the optimal position for display, which is a huge win over Super7’s Teenage Muntant Ninja Turtles ReAction (I’ll have a look at those here soon!) where they just are just rattling around in their bubbles. Sure, the later is more accurate for the vintage vibe they’re going for, but I’m willing to embrace the anachronism for a better display item. The sculpting on these figures is sharp and the paint is bright and clean. Of the three, I think Lion-O and Cheetara are the best at representing their characters. That’s not to say Panthro is bad, but I think he lost a little too much of his buff physique when being adapted to this format. These look like they’re the result of a lot more love and care than Funko ever injected into their ReAction figures, and the quality seems to be leaps and bounds better too. The accessories are pretty much what I would expect, with the ‘Cats possessing their iconic weapons. Panthro has his nun-chucks, connected with a piece of black string. Lion-O comes with both versions of the Sword of Omens, one retracted and one extended, as well as his Claw Shield. The swords are cast in gray plastic with the Eye of Thundara painted on the hilts. Cheetara’s staff is obviously the least interesting of the arsenal. Let’s move on to Mumm-Ra and the Evil Mutants!

As with the Cats, I think Super7 made some good character choices here as well. Mumm-Ra was a no brainer, but I would have been happier with either this or his decrepit mummy form. Slithe is the Leader of the Evil Mutants, so he was a natural choice. As for Jackalman? Well, honestly they could have gone with him or Monkian and I would have been fine. Poor Vultureman never seems to get any love. Ah well, maybe in the next Wave.

The card art for the baddies is (mostly) every bit as good as what we got for the Cats. I’m not ashamed to admit that Mumm-Ra scared the ever-living shit out of me when I was a kid, and this character art captures that freakish terror perfectly. From his beady red eyes, to his grasping claw and his shredded bandages, I can practically hear his demented blathering. Slithe has that bloated and confused look that he often shows, although they didn’t quite get his one popped eye right for the card. Finally, Jackalman looks good, but his jaw looks like it’s kind of sloffing off. But seriously, I’m nitpicking. This art is just fantastic.

As for the figures, they’re pretty great too. I was particularly interested to see how they would do Mumm-Ra’s cape and bandages, and they went with sculpted bandages and a vinyl cape, and I wholeheartedly approve. Slithe is particularly cool because they gave him his short and squat body type and his tail can be seen tucked between his legs too. As for Jackalman, well his little noggin is a work of art. As with the Cats, the coloring on these figures is superb. They’re bright and beautiful with some sharp lines and careful applications. As for accessories, Mumm-Ra comes with his sword and a dagger, Slithe comes with his axe, which is mostly hidden behind his back, and Jackalman comes with his spiked club.

By now the ThunderCats have been released in just about every scale and style I can imagine. From the more animated faithful figures made by Ban Dai and Mattel to the vintage Masters of the Universe style of Funko’s Savage World, and now we have the old Kenner style. I like these a lot, and I think the characters translated pretty well, but I can imagine that they aren’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea. The biggest advantage to these little fellows would be allowing vehicles to be smaller and less costly, but I’m not sure if that’s part of Super7’s plans. Still, a 3 3/4-inch scale ReAaction Thundertank would be damn cool, not to mention a little playset based around Mumm-Ra’s tomb. Anything like that would certainly get me to spring for a second set of these to open and play with. In the meantime, I’ll just be anxiously awaiting a second wave. How about Tygra, WilyKIt, WilyKat, Shriveled Mumm-Ra, Monkian, and Vulture Man. Yeah, that would do nicely!

ReAction Transformers (Wave One) by Super7

I’ve been sick as a dog for the last two days and I didn’t think I was going to be able to get any midweek content in, but thanks to just the right cocktail of Nyquil, cough drops, and Jameson, I’ve managed to prop myself up at my computer and tap something out that’s quick and painless. A little thing called Toy Fair happened over the weekend and boy there were a lot of surprises and tons of cool stuff shown. One of those things was Super7’s new Wave of ReAction Transformers. These are kind of like the old Action Masters, in that they don’t transform, with a smidgen of Heroes of Cybertron. They’re roughly 3 3/4-inch scale, they’re based on the Sunbow cartoon designs, and like most ReAction figures they feature a nostalgic five points of articulation. The moment I saw these on the cards, I knew I was going all in. Unfortunately, I only have one set and I’m not opening them, so we’ll just have to settle for checking them out in package. And that’s fine, because I think these shine the most when carded. The initial assortment consists of Megatron, Starscream, and Soundwave from the Decpticons, and Optimus Prime, Jazz, and Bumblebee from the Autobots. Let’s start with the Autobots!

Oh yeah! These cards are absolutely gorgeous! We get all new character art, unique for each card, showing the character against a Cybertronian backdrop. The bubble is orientated to the left and the borders feature the familiar grid pattern that transitions from black to red, just like it did on the original figure packages. The top of the card has the iconic original Transformers logo in red for the Autobots and purple for the Decepticons, and you get the Kenner-style ReAction logo on the bottom right hand side. Even the character’s name above the figure is printed in the yellow and black box similar to how they originally called out the character’s name and function. The figures are secured in a tray so they don’t rattle around in the bubble like some ReAction figures do, and if they have a weapon it’s placed to the figure’s right.

On the flipside, you get a classic “Collect Them All” style spread showing all the figures in the wave. I’ll note that this card-back is taken from Soundwave and not Optimus Prime, as it has the Transformers logo in purple and says “Evil Decepticons.” I really dig that they even did some customization on the back, but I’m only going to show the reverse side for one. And yeah, I would have loved a reprint of the old tech spec card on the bottom instead of the multi-lingual warnings, but I guess you have to pay the lawyers, right?

Prime looks pretty good, although this is the one figure in this wave where the proportions are a little off. He seems a tad big-headed and his upper body makes his legs look a little scrawny. It’s not too bad, but worth pointing out, especially since the rest don’t really have this problem. The simple sculpt reflects the animated style of the cartoon, but there are still some great touches of detail like the markings on his forearms and the vents in his lower legs. The head sculpt looks great too. The coloring is just about perfect, with bright red and blue plastic and a flat gray for what would have been silver on the toy. There’s even some yellow paint hits on the pelvis and the chest windshield is painted blue. Finally, you get an Autobot symbol stamped on his left shoulder. I think this one is the weakest of the bunch for me, which is ironic because it’s freaking Optimus Prime. I still dig him, but I think he needed some tweaks. Prime comes with his iconic buster-rifle, which he can hold in his right hand.

Jazz is up next and I think he turned out great. I especially love his character art, where he’s offering a reassuring smirk, giving me the thumbs up, and just oozing personality and character. I can practically hear Scatman Crothers voice when I look at it. The figure is also excellent, although I would have liked a wider stance for just about all of these figures. The head sculpt on the figure is superb. Here you get a white and black deco with a couple of shades of gray and some blue and red hits, and of course a beautiful Autobot insignia on the chest-hood. Jazz comes with his gun, which looks to be accurate to the original toy’s weapon, and it looks like he can hold it either hand.

The last of the Autobots is Bumblebee, and this is probably my favorite of the three. I was surprised too! But for some reason as a kid I was obsessed with having a figure that actually looked like Bumblebee in the cartoon and this is about as close as I’ll likely ever come. His character art is pretty solid, but it’s the figure really shines for me. It reflects all those impossible changes in the cartoon where his car kibble is softened over to the point where you can barely make out the hood details in his feet, his upper arms are black instead of yellow with those segmented round tubes for elbows, and his chest is flattened and boxed out instead of curved. I absolutely love it! The head is probably too big, but I’m OK with that and I like how they emphasized his devil horns. The coloring here is mostly black and yellow but with some blue added for the windows and the red Autobot insignia on his chest. Unfortunately, the paint on this one is the weakest of the bunch. The paint lines on the black are a little rough in some areas, but it’s not terribly apparent when the figure is in hand. Bumblebee comes with his little pistol and I’m glad they included that! I should also note here that Bumblebee is scaled to be smaller than the other figures in the wave and that’s pretty cool too! Moving on to the Decepticons!

Megatron’s card art is epic, as he stands with his fusion cannon aimed and ready to fire. The figure is no slouch either. Maybe a little too much upper body bulk compared to his legs, but it’s all good. The head sculpt is just about perfect, and little touches in the figure’s detail include the triggers on the tops of the shoulders, the little triangles on his chest, and the vents on his abdomen. The pale white plastic they used is a great fit for his cartoon color and you get some darker gray on the legs, black for the cannon, pelvis and fists, red in the elbows, and some red,  yellow, and blue paint hits for the panel under his chest. Megatron doesn’t come with an accessory, but that’s because he has his mounted arm cannon. I think this guy turned out all kinds of great.

Up next is Soundwave, and oh boy is he perfect! The card art shows him holding his rather distinctive gun and about to eject one of his Cassette Warriors and it looks so damn great. The figure features a sharp sculpt and you get some cool details from the tape deck buttons on his pelvis to the vents on his lower legs. The coloring here is spot on from the blue and gray body to the yellow and red applications, it’s all right on the money. You even get the razor thin red stripes around his forearms. I like that they used the same blue for his tape door as the Autobots’ windows, it adds a nice uniformity to the line’s color palate. Soundwave comes with his battery gun, and they went all out with the paint on this one, giving it the red accents and painting the beam emitter silver. I’d say this is my favorite of the Decpticons, but there’s some pretty stiff competition here because Starscream is coming up next.

 

And he serves up some tough competition. Starscream’s card art oozes arrogance as he stands with hands on hips and offering a defiant smirk. The figure’s bubble is extra wide to accommodate the wingspan, and I’ll mention here again how much I dig the subtle size differences in some fo these figures. This sculpt is up there with the best of them, and it’s good they did such a fine job because I presume we’ll be seeing it at least two more times. Five more if they want to give us The Rainmakers, and hell yeah I’d buy them too. The head sculpt is possibly the best of the bunch. They captured Starscream perfectly, and I’ll be interested to see if the other Seekers get original portraits or if they just keep using this one. Like Megatron, the pale gray plastic they use here looks great, as does the blue and red coloring. He’s got red and white striping on his wings, as well as Decepticon insignia, and the yellow on the cockpit really makes the figure pop. Starscream comes with Megatron on his gun form.

The idea of Transformers that don’t transform may seem pretty daft to a lot of people, and I get that. But ever since I was a kid I wanted a proper line of figures based on the classic Sunbow designs, and these scratch that itch wonderfully. Indeed, if these were swinging on the pegs when I was a kid I would have gone crazy over them. Granted, I can’t vouch for how much fun they are but every time I glance over at them carded and standing on my shelf, I can’t help but smile. Better articulation would have been optimal, but I think this format gives us the best chance of getting a lot of figures. I will likely buy a couple doubles to open at some point down the road, but right now I’m just so excited about what else is coming for this series. The stuff Super7 showed off at Toy Fair looks great, and I hope this line goes on forever.

Reaction Robotech by Super7

It’s been another trying week for me, and by that I mean trying to get time to contribute any content here. To be honest, the one day I had any meaningful time, I spent being a lazy slob and reading comics and drinking whiskey, so I have no one but myself to blame. I almost wasn’t even going to bother checking in at all today, but then I got a huge lot of Reaction figures from Super7 that were on sale and I decided I’d drop in today with a quick look at some of them, or to be more specific… the Robotech line! If you’re not familiar with it, the Reaction line has had its share of ups and downs. It started with good intentions, take the original prototypes of the never produced Alien figures and release them. There were probably more than a few other licenses this would have worked with, like The Last Starfighter, which also had unproduced figures. But then Funko went berserk and started producing them for every license they can get a hold of. Some of these were pretty cool. I liked the 80’s Slashers and the Big Trouble in Little China figures, but a lot of them were just garbage. Well, Super7 has taken back their ball and it looks like they’re doing some interesting things with it. They produced six figures in this Robotech line, but I’m only looking at three of them today.

Robotech was huge for me growing up. Back then, I didn’t know that it was a cobbled together mess of something called Macross, but in that regard I guess it was the first anime series I was exposed to. I loved it and I wanted those Matchbox toys something fierce. I never got them, because my parents were shrewd about me investing in toy lines I already collected rather than branching out, and in retrospect it was a good idea. Nonetheless, when I first got wind Super7 was doing Reaction Robotech, I dreamed of seeing Rick Hunter, Roy Fokker, and the like all on beautiful cardbacks. And who knows? Maybe even some bigger vehicles. Well, Super7 went a different way and gave us the vehicles instead. It was a weird move to make, especially in the 3 3/4-inch scale, and so I passed until a few turned up cheap. Ultimately I picked up The SDF-1, VF-1S, and a Zentraedi Battle Pod. I’m not opening these, but we’ll take a quick look at them in package.

The SDF-1 is obviously the biggest of the bunch, although since it isn’t in scale, the card size is the same as the others. The card art is pretty cool, especially the way it shows it towering above the city-scape. The figure itself is a great sculpt for a figure in this size and I think the coloring is pretty on point too. It strides the fine line between being retro and actually looking like a decent figure. Articulation includes swivels in the shoulders and hips, and I’m not sure if the head can turn or not. This one was easily the most unlikely candidate for this type of figure, but in the end, I think they did a nice job with it. The back of the card has a little blurb about the vehicle as well as artwork for each of the six figures available in this line.

Next up is the VF-1S Veritech Fighter, and as the back of the package points out, it’s Roy Fokker’s Skull One. Once again, this is a decent sculpt for the format, although the proportions feel a bit off on this one. I feel like the legs should be longer and beefier to make up for the broad shoulders, but maybe they were intentionally going for a certain retro charm. The paint on the figure is especially well done, with the appropriate black and yellow accents and the Jolly Roger stamped on the chest. You get the straight five points of articulation and there’s a rifle included. The rifle can be held in the hand or clipped to the forearm.

And finally, here is the Zentaedi Battle Pod, and I think this is without a doubt the best looking of the bunch. The sculpt is simple, but it looks dead on, and the paint looks great. Because of the unusual design, the articulation is a little different. You still get rotating legs at the hips, but there’s obviously no arms or head. Instead, Super7 gave the guns ball joints, which is a mighty nice surprise, especially for a figure in a strictly 5-POA style collection.

I dig these figures quite a bit, but I haven’t decided whether or not I’m going to complete the series, and I probably won’t buy doubles to open unless I can find them for really cheap. As is the case with a lot of Reaction figures, the appeal here is supposed to be in the presentation. On that note, I probably would have preferred Super7 went with screen grabs from the cartoon for the card art, or even just copies of the animation models. Don’t get me wrong, I like what we got here, but direct art from the show would have been better suited to what they’re doing here. And I’d still like to see Super7 expand this line to the actual characters from the show. I’d buy all of those in a heartbeat.

Masters of the Universe Classics: Karg by Super7

I was supposed to wrap up my look at Super7’s second wave of Collector’s Choice figures weeks ago, but I got sidetracked by Halloween content and I’m only now getting to open the last figure in the wave. Anyway, today’s figure is Karg and he’s special because he’s one of a handful of figures based off the 1987 Masters of the Universe film. Matty gave us Blade and Saurod, and now Super7’s addition of Karg nearly rounds out the quartet of baddies pretty well with only Beastman still out of the picture. Although I shudder to think what I would give up to get a Skeletor and Evil-Lyn from this flick. Young Meg Foster… Yum!

The packaging is right in line with what we were getting from Matty for all those years. And speaking of all those years, there’s a nice Tenth Anniversary logo on this one, celebrating the line from 2010-2018. That’s a long time! No wonder I have so many boxes of these figures! Karg’s tagline labels him as the “Evil Inquisitor With A Horrible Hook” which I presume makes him Skeletor’s chief torturer and that’s some pretty harsh shit for kids toy line. The back shows a spread of figures from Super7’s two most recent waves and you get a bio on the back that works Karg into the mainstream Masters Classics canon.

Here he is out of the package and I’ll go ahead and say it: Super7 did a nice job recreating the costume from the film, at least in terms of the sculpt. It’s not 100%, probably due to copyright issues, but the influences are certainly there. The chest and shoulder armor are comprised of one piece, sculpted in soft plastic, and permanently attached to the buck. There are some nice details around his gorget and under the armor he has a quilted tunic that hangs below his waist and is belted in place. They even recreated that distinctive horn-like emblem for his belt buckle. Sculpted onto his belt are various tools hanging down, which I would imagine are some kind of torture instruments. Below that you get some smooth leggings and buccaneer-style boots. The coloring here, on the other hand, is a big departure from his on screen look. The figure eschews the browns, coppers, and golds of the big screen costume for a metallic blue deco. It may not jibe in terms of screen accuracy, but I do like it a lot. Hell, I actually prefer it. I like my MOTUC figures crazy and flashy, and this beautiful paint job is certainly delivers that and with a gorgeous paint job. The metallic blue is exceptional and I like the silver detailing on the tools.

If there’s one thing here that I’m not too crazy about it’s his cape. It’s extremely wide, and while the sculpted woolly pattern on the top half is well done, it just doesn’t look all that great from the back. I wish it was removable, but it’s permanently attached to the chest armor. At least I don’t mind it so much when viewed from the front.

As for the head sculpt? Well, it’s a work of art. Karg’s mask was an impressive piece of work in the film and this figure captures that look very well. The skin tone has been changed up to green, but the sculpt itself is as faithful as I could want. From the wrinkled skin to the somewhat porcine nose, everything just looks great. I especially dig the sunken eyes and the very distinctive paint used for the eyes themselves. The hair isn’t quite as poofy as movie Karg’s white coif, and it’s been re-colored to yellow. I’m fine with that and I like how you can see his very alien-looking ears peeking out through the hair. Oh yeah, and he has an Elizabethan Collar around his neck! As many times as I’ve watched that movie, I never noticed it until seeing it on this figure and comparing it with stills from the flick.

I’ve yet to mention one of Karg’s most distinguishing features, and that’s the “Horrible Hook” that he has grafted onto his left arm. It’s your standard pirate hook and it does swivel at the base and have a slightly barbed end to it. My only little gripe here is that the hook had a much cooler design to it on the early prototype. It’s a pity they changed it for the final product.

Karg comes with two accessories, the first of which is the delightfully named Dagger of Agony. It actually looks like it might supposed to be an energy blade of some kind, but I don’t really know anything about it. As far as accessories go, it’s OK, but I think the design is a little dull and certainly doesn’t live up to its foreboding name.

Second, you get this pretty cool laser blaster. It’s got a bit of a Star Wars vibe to it and I can certainly get behind that! I’ll definitely be displaying him with this over the dagger.

In case you can’t tell, I really love this figure. It’s not only great that Super7 was able to get us one more original character from the ’87 movie, but I think Karg is a wonderful addition to Skeletor’s Minions. This figure represents some superb sculpting and excellent paintwork. Is there a downside? Well, Super7 have opened the pre-orders for their third wave of Filmation Style figures, but I haven’t seen any word on a third wave of Collector’s Choice figures. These new characters have been my main focus, and it would be a shame if we didn’t get any more of them.

Masters of the Universe Classics: Granita by Super7

I was supposed to be opening my fourth and final figure in Super7’s most recent Collector’s Choice wave today, but I got side-tracked last week and forgot to include these in the rotation. Yeah, sorry about that. But today I’m putting things to right by getting back on track and opening up Granita, the “Heroic Comet Combatant!” And I have to be honest, this is going to be a rough ride…

At some point in the 80’s, toy company execs crumbled under the enormous pressure (and probably copious amounts of cocaine) to come up with new ideas… and the rock transformers were born! For the Go-Bots it was the Rock Lords and for Masters of the Universe, it was the Comet Warriors, Rokkon and Stonedar. That pair got updates in Matty’s MOTUC line, but their among the few figures I never hunted down (and yet, I bought the Star Sisters, so… go figure!). I probably wouldn’t have bothered with this third Comet Warrior, Granita, either, but she was in an assortment with three other figures I wanted real bad, so let’s check her out.

As a Comet Warrior, Granita comes with her rock armor, but we’ll start with the base figure. She looks good and I get a strong Filmation vibe off of her, despite the fact that I don’t remember ever seeing her in the cartoon. She’s got light blue skin and a somewhat futuristic looking red and pink one-piece as well as some matching knee and elbow pads that make her look like she should be wearing roller-skates. But nope, just some low boots. She also has a gold belt with sockets in the front and back, and we’ll come back to those. Granita’s design is simple enough, but I like it, and the coloring and quality of paint are all up to snuff to make for a nice looking figure.

I also dig her head sculpt a lot. She’s pretty and has a somewhat distant and serene expression that makes her look alien, and a dome of green “hair” which is supposed to be rock, but honestly looks more like hair… unless you attach the rock piece to her back and here it looks a bit more like longer, stone hair. It does mess with the ball joint under her chest, but I could still see myself displaying her with this piece on. And believe me, this is the only one of her rock pieces that works reasonably well. I say, reasonably because the color doesn’t quite match and no matter how hard I adjust it, there’s always a big gap between her hair and the lower back piece. Also, I’m not really sure how stone hair works. Does she get gravel instead of dandruff?

Granita’s other rock pieces consist of a shell piece and four pieces of rock armor that clip onto her arms and legs… well, in theory they do. To be fair, I can get these to stay on well enough if she’s just standing in place, but as soon as I pick her up or try to pose her they fall off because the clips are just way too loose. I can’t even begin to articulate how frustrating this is. Get one three pieces on and another falls off. It’s a shame because they did a nice job sculpting the stone and I love the circuitry printed on the interior of the pieces. It’s even painted over with a metallic silver to bring out the detail. But what befuddles me is: How could they not get these clips to work right? It seems like a simple enough concept. And hell, if they couldn’t get the clips to work, they should have just had them peg into the figure. Of course, all of this gets pretty problematic when I try to transform her into her rock mode.

Here you can see that her rock mode is just her bending over into the extra rock piece with her armor forming a shell. I left two of the pieces off in the above shot to show what’s going on in there. But forget about actually getting her to transform into her rock form without the armor falling off. I found the only way to go is to bend her over and then put all the pieces on afterwards, and even that is an exercise in frustration, not to mention when you’re done you just have a lump of green plastic rock, so I’m not sure the ends justify the profanity-enduing means.

“This is fine!”

In addition to her dubious rock parts, Granita also comes with a little blaster pistol and I do dig the design of this thing. It’s got a cool retro vibe to it, with a big gold disk on the end. And as a nod to the vintage toy, you can even plug it into the hole on her belt. On the downside, her hands with the outward pointing thumbs, aren’t the best choice to go with this weapon.

When I set out to open this figure and write this review, I had no idea how dire things were going to turn out. No, I’m actually not disappointed to have Granita in my collection. The figure itself looks good and she displays fine with the rock pieces on, but this is a case where the gimmick fails so miserably that they would have been better off working around it. I would have been much happier to get the figure with stylized and permanently attached rock armor while not being able to transform her into a lump of space rock. Honestly, it’s not a great gimmick to begin with. Maybe I would probably be a lot happier if I had Stonedar and her brother Rokkon to display with her, but I’m not likely to hunt those down and so Granita will have to remain the sole (and highly mediocre) Comet Warrior in my collection.

Masters of the Universe Classics: Dylamug by Super7

As promised, I’m back with another figure from Wave 2 of Super7’s MOTUC Collectors’ Choice series. If you’re just joining me, this is basically a continuation of Matty Collector’s Masters Classics line, with all new characters. Last week I opened up Wrap-Trap from The Evil Horde and I’m going to keep that sweet Horde lovin’ going this week with a look at what may be one of the wackiest MOTUC figures yet, Dylamug!

The packaging is mostly the same as what we’ve been getting all along. You do get Super7’s logo as well as a Tenth Anniversary tag, but otherwise this card design will fit right in with the one Matty used. The back of the card features some nice character art, a “Collect Them All” spread of the other figures available, and a bio of the character, which is all well and good, but all I need to know about Dylamug is that he likes forcing peasants to dance on tables and throwing pies at innkeepers. Yeah, he knows how to wield power! If you’re a mint on card collector, you may find that your Dylamug’s face isn’t completely dialed in right. Mine shifted a bit in transit, but that doesn’t bother me because I’m about to rip this bitch open!

Dylamug is kind of like MODOK meets Arnim Zola meets a Horde Trooper. He’s effectively a giant face in a can with spindly arms and legs. Other than the giant Horde symbol on his forehead, Dylamug’s body itself doesn’t sport a lot of detail, which lends itself well to the animated look of the cartoon, but might make him look a bit unfinished to some. There’s even a recessed square on his back that looks like it should have had some kind of sculpted detail, like circuitry or something. Indeed, some may say that Dylamug belongs more with one of the Filmation-based waves, but these are not hard and fast rules and I’m happy to let him coexist with my regular-flavored MOTUC Horde figures. Dylamug does have some black hoses running off his arms, legs, and shoulders, as well as a series of transparent tubes sprouting from the top of his head with various instruments inside them. I like these, they look like old radio tubes and give him a cool retro-tech kind of look.

Dylamug gets his name from the fact that the eyes and mouth on his face can be rotated to form different expressive combinations. It’s kind of like a different take on the Man-E-Faces or Tri-Klops gimmick. I don’t remember the gimmick being worked into his appearances in the cartoon, but it’s a pretty cool play feature. With three different sets of eyes and three different mouths you can come up with some neat expressions. I was a little worried about how this would work, considering Super7’s Filmation Tri-Klops came with his head stuck, but Dylamug has no issues with his facial swaps.

The articulation here isn’t bad for what he is. The arms have ball joints in the shoulders and hinges in the elbows while the legs rotate at the hips and have hinges in the knees. The ankles have hinges and lateral rockers, and there’s a swivel where his legs meet his head-body. I would have loved some swivels in the wrists, but I’m not disappointed with what we got. I’m also quite surprised that those leg joints can hold the bulk of the figure. Hopefully that will still be the case over time.

In terms of accessories, Dylamug’s extras are pretty hit and miss with me and all of them revolve around the Horde emblem on his forehead. You get one that’s designed after the Filmation look and one that’s designed after the vintage toy look. Swapping them out is easy as they just plug into a hole in his forehead and they stay put when handling him.

The third emblem is supposed to be an effect part to display him firing his laser beam, but the effect is pretty damn lousy. Most of the failure of this piece is in the paint job. If they had cast it in translucent red plastic it might have worked better, but as it is it just looks like he has a big dart sticking out of his head. To be honest, I would have so much preferred they designed some kind of crossbow attachment for his arm. Getting a Horde member without a personalized crossbow seems all kinds of wrong.

Since his reveal, Dylamug has garnered an unusual amount of scorn around some of the fan forums that I lurk at. Honestly, I’m not sure why. He’s a unique character and in a line full of crazy designs, he still manages to stand out in the crowd. Personally, I was super happy to see him get included in this wave and I’m extremely pleased with how he turned out. Sure, the effect part is a hopeless flub, but I’ll just toss it into The Bin of Forgotten Accessories. It’s not like it ruins the figure itself. Indeed, so far this wave is scoring a two out of two. Next Wednesday we’ll see if it can keep that record rolling as I open the third figure in the assortment. I just haven’t decided which one that will be yet!

Masters of the Universe Classics: Wrap-Trap by Super7

Even with Matty Collector long dead and buried, Super7 is keeping the Masters of the Universe Classics ship afloat by continuing to release the figures! It’s not the same quantity as when Club Greyskull was going full guns, but so far it’s just been a couple waves of four each year. I’ve had the willpower to resist going in on the Filmation style figures because I just can’t fall down that rabbit hole of buying a second version of every damn character. I am, however, picking up the Collectors’ Choice figures, which are basically just all new characters.

And that second wave of four Collectors’ Choice figures just arrived at my door in this shipper box. There’s nothing in the way of packing, so if you’re collecting these to be Mint On Card, your mileage may vary. My shipper box was a little bit beaten up, but the figures arrived just fine. Inside, each figure even comes comes in an individual mailer, just like Matty used to do. This wave includes two Horde members, one movie-based character, and a comet chick. I’m going to start with the Horde Mummy Wrap-Trap, partly because it’s the beginning of Halloween Season and partly because he’s the figure I was most looking forward to!

Super7 didn’t mess around with the packaging much. It’s still the familiar green stone Greyskull design and apart from a few modifications, it could easily be taken for the original Matty packages. In addition to their logo, they did add the Tenth Anniversary icon to the package. They also brought back the bios on the cardbacks, something that Matty did away with in the waning days of their releases. And thank god for that, because otherwise, I wouldn’t know anything about any of these characters. And check out that bitchin’ character art on the back of the card! These figures look great carded, and if I had the money and space I’d love to have a wall full of them. But I don’t and they’re not collector friendly, so I have no choice but to tear these open.

Wrap-Trap is a mummy warrior with allegiances to The Horde and man does he look great! The sculpted mummy wrappings are quite detailed and painted in an off-white to make them look slightly aged. They’re also pretty ragged with uncovered spaces allowing W-T’s sinewy green muscles to show through. Each of these exposed areas include a piece of wrapping that’s hanging off to signify that they either got loose, tore, or just fell off. Wrappy also features a sculpted harness holding a large Horde symbol on his chest, and he has smaller Horde symbols on his lower left leg and left bicep. Finally, he has a simple waist belt with a large green oval belt buckle.

The paint on this figure is pretty solid, although there are a few lines between the green muscle and white wrapping that could have been a little sharper. That’s mostly just the case on my figure’s right bicep and the straps on his back. It’s not something that I noticed right away, but rather on closer inspection. It’s worth mentioning, but certainly not something that’s going to ruin my enjoyment of the figure. Everything else is excellent and I love the bright green they used for his exposed body. It really makes the figure pop next to the drab, white bandages. They also used a bit of black wash for the the Horde symbol on his chest, which adds some nice depth to the sculpt.

Wrap-Trap’s fantastic portrait ties this figure together beautifully. The head is covered in more mummy wraps, but has an exposed window to show off his eyes and the bridge of where his nose would be if it hadn’t rotted off his nasty face. The coloring is the real showcase here, as you have more of that great bright green with some yellow brushing and a pair of glossy red eyes set below his prominent and creased brow. He looks like a guy I wouldn’t want to mess with. He also looks like he probably smells a bit.

The articulation here is everything I’ve come to expect from my MOTUC figures with the addition of the hinges in the wrists. With over 100 reviews of these bucks, I’m not going to run through it again. I will say, however, that the joints feel really good. Nothing is stuck out of the package, none of them are too tight or too loose. I mention it because Super7’s previous wave had some of those issues, but here it’s all good!

Wrap-Trap comes with two accessories: A scimitar and a crossbow. The sword is a really unique looking piece with a curved hooded cobra making up the gold hilt. The blade has a sweeping curve and a forked point, which may or may not be meant to invoke a serpent’s tongue. He can hold the sword in either hand and it really suits him. I just love the imagination that went into this weapon’s design!

And speaking of imaginative designs, one of the reasons I dig The Horde figures so much is that they each come with their own personalized crossbow and some of these are damn cool. In this case you get a very Egyptian-themed weapon with a scarab and wing motif. The scrab is painted blue while the rest of the weapon is painted in some sumptuous gold with a satin finish. The scarab holds a green orb in his pincers, which I presume is where the energy bolt shoots out of. There are also some basic sculpted details at the back of the weapon suggesting some kind of controls. Considering how slow they usually are, it’s nice someone finally gave a Mummy a projectile weapon.

Of all the figures in this wave, I was excited for Wrap-Trap the most, and now that he’s in hand I can happily say he does not disappoint. I could make a few minor nitpicks about the paint, but otherwise this figure shows a marked improvement in the little QC niggles that showed up in the original Super7 wave. The sculpt is great, the colors are beautiful, and the figure is loads of fun to pose and play with. Not to mention I’m always thrilled to get more soldiers for my Evil Horde. And just an administrative note: For the next three weeks, Wednesdays here at FFZ are going to be occupied with these new Masters figures. My hope is that by the time I’m done getting through these Collectors’ Choice figures, I can turn Wednesdays over to the massive inrush of figures from Mythic Legions’ Advent of Decay, which are due to start shipping out in the next couple of weeks!