Mythic Legions (Advent of Decay): King No’Glin by The Four Horsemen

My apologies folks, but it was another week of stunted content. And I was doing so well for a while there! Well, these tough weeks are still going to crop up now and again. I had originally planned today’s review for Wednesday, but I didn’t get any time to work on it until Wednesday night, so I had to cut my losses and bump it to the end of the week. Hopefully next week I’ll be back to firing on all cylinders. But for now, let’s just get on with it… It’s been a few weeks since I checked back in with Mythic Legions, and if memory serves I was in the process of running through reviews of all the Goblins! Today we’ll look to the very top of these grubby little bastards with the Goblin King himself, No’Glin! We’ve seen the Advent of Decay packaging so many times by now, let’s just jump right in to the figure!

And doesn’t No’Glin look every bit the distinguished Goblin monarch? Hell, I can just smell the Napoleon Complex wafting off of this guy! He dons full plate armor from neck to toe, which is basically a bronze version of what we saw worn by the likes of Knubnik and Thwikk. The big difference here is the middle armor which features some more ornate pieces to protect his hips and little Goblin man-jewels. The optional pair of shoulder armor is the same sculpt worn by Knubnik, which has a roughly-hewn and jagged flavor that I think works great for these little buggers. The new coloring for the armor is fantastic, giving it a bit more regal flavor than that of his rank-and-file subjects, while still looking functional. A little wash helps to bring out the details in the sculpt, as well as the bits of wear and weathering. He also has some more copper colored bits in the arms and upper legs, and sculpted chainmail can be seen in the elbows and knees. I don’t think I’ll ever cease to be impressed with the way T4H’s sculpt and paint conspire to make these plastic armor suits look so realistic.

No’Glin comes with two tattered capes, one red and one black. Based on the promotional photos, I think these are supposed to be worn together, but I’m more keen on just giving him the red one. It’s visibly dirty and I think it reflects how difficult it is for No’Glin to look majestic when he basically lives in a hole in the ground. It’s got to be tough to keep clean in those tunnels! Besides, I may wind up giving the black cape to Snagg. He looks like he could use a cape.

The head sculpt is magnificent, and that’s been the case with all the Goblins so far. No’Glin features a broad and squat face with a slightly conceited grin and two beady yellow eyes that peer out from beneath his crown. The crown itself looks like it’s carved out of an old tree stump and features cuts in the side to allow his long pointed ears to jut out and a tiny animal skull positioned on the forehead. The woodgrain pattern sculpted into the crown is magnificent and I was initially convinced that the crown was a separate sculpt and could be removed, but it’s actually part of the head. It really does look that good!

No’Glin comes equipped with a passel of different weapons, but the ones I chose to put on his belt are his standard broadsword and the hooked dagger and sheath that we first saw a while back with Lucretia the Vampire. The plastic sheath hooks onto the brown sword belt and has been repainted brown and bronze to match No’Glin’s armor. At first I thought this accessory would be a little too fancy for him, but it actually looks good on his belt. And being a king and all, he should probably have some bits of finery. The sword is one of the designs that we’ve been seeing since the original Kickstarter, with a straight guard and a simple disc pommel. The blade is silver and the hilt has a nice antiqued finish to it. By now, y’all should know I’m a big fan of this simple, serviceable, no-nonsense sword.

He also comes with two more exotic swords, one of which is a sickle-type blade we’ve seen before. In fact, we last saw its like equipped by one of his subjects, Thwikk. It has a silver painted blade and a simple hilt with gold fixtures and a blue grip. The design isn’t terribly Goblin-y to me, but the size is just right and it’s fancier than his regular sword. The other blade is an Orc sword, which I believe was introduced to us in Advent of Decay. There are no paint application on this piece, instead it’s cast all in silver. That feels like a bit of a cheap-out, but then again he does come with a lot of stuff. Again, there’s nothing new here, but since both of these weapons are newer additions to the Mythic Legions armory, so I’m happy to get them again.

And since all kings need some kind of staff, No’Glin comes with a spiked mace head on a long shaft, painted in bronze to match his armor. I last encountered this weapon when I reviewed Faustia, although she was part of the assortment that came afterwards, so it’s only fair to point out that The Goblin King had it first. It’s a very long weapon, so much so that it looks kind of silly when No’Glin is holding it straight up with the butt resting on the ground. It would have been cool if T4H made this piece so you can take a part of the shaft out and shorten it. I’m just going to assume it’s an ornamental weapon because I just can’t see him swinging it with any force.

Even with so many of them already on my shelf, I can’t even put into words the high I get off of opening these figures. You simply can’t go wrong with Mythic Legions’ Goblins and that goes double for their King. Apart from the head, there’s virtually nothing new here, and yet T4H continues to prove themselves to be wizards at mixing and matching parts to come up with a figure that still feels fresh and new. And the new head sculpt is just packed with personality. No’Glin is going to look great ruling over my Goblin Horde and leading them against Mythoss’ forces of good. I only wish we had a little throne for him. Then again with how popular and lucrative Mythic Legions continues to be, I think anything is possible. I mean, if T4H have already begun producing horses, maybe a selection of thrones isn’t out of the question some time down the road. Come on, Horsemen, give us some thrones in the next Kickstarter!

Mythic Legions (Siege at Bjorngar): Thwikk by The Four Horsemen

As I mentioned last week, the Mythic Legions figures are piling up and I need to get cracking through these, so I’m opening another one this week. And since I looked at one of the big Ogres last time, I thought I’d turn my attention to one of the little guys. The Goblins are easily my favorite addition to Mythoss since the line began and I was actually kind of shocked to see that I’ve only reviewed two of them so far. There are still more from Advent of Decay to check out, but today I’m jumping ahead to Siege at Bjorngar and having a look at Thwikk!

I don’t always bother with packaged shots on these figures, since the packaging hasn’t changed much, but here’s one anyway. Thwikk’s bio tells us he’s a crack-shot marksman with a crossbow and he leads teams of scouts around the perimeter of Gobhollow to seek out threats. That makes him sound a lot nobler than the previous Gobbies that I encountered, but then his bio also says he excels at dispensing pain, so I guess nobility is relative when you’re talking about dirty little Goblins.

Thwikk comes out of the package requiring a little set up. His tiny little shoulders have to be pegged on and his brown sword belt slipped around his waist. Of course both of these are optional, but I almost always utilize them for display. This fella is fully armored from neck to toe and it appears to be the same sculpt as we saw used on Knubnik, with Thwikk only missing the disc on his belt. And while Knubnik’s armor was left with a worn and muddied bare metal look, Thwikk’s armor has a little more variety with a combination of blackened iron finish and silver paint. This deco picks out the detail nicely and gives the armor a rather distinctive look even though it’s mostly the same. His sculpted furry diaper is painted blue with a black wash and you get some copper paint on the exposed chain-mail bits. The shoulders here are different from both of the Goblins I’ve looked at before with segmented plates, instead of the crude and jagged look. I dig them!

As always, these Goblin head sculpts feature tons of personality and Thwikk is just oozing Goblin charisma. His simple pitted helmet hangs low over the bridge of his nose and between his beady yellow eyes. It adds an even more sinister flavor to his visage. That coupled with his wide evil grin and pointed chin makes him teeter on the edge between caricature and nightmare. His helmet is adorned with two red ram horns, which can be attached and rotated to your personal liking. I prefer to keep the tips swept back.

This figure is also one of the few times I’ve been able to make use of the extra bits that plug into the figures’ backs. T4H throws these bits in with every single figure, and while they mostly seem to be designed to attach wings, this one allows Thwikk to carry his crossbow on his back. It’s a fantastic option that allows this little guy to carry all of his armaments at once. No small feat! And since we’ve moved onto his weapons and accessories, let’s start with the crossbow!

We’ve seen this crossbow before, as it was introduced in Advent of Decay and I think the first figure I opened that had it was Delphina of Eathyross. This time it’s given a more practical finish of just black and brown, and it comes equipped with a brown string. Now, I’m sure I mentioned in Delphina’s review that this weapon isn’t exactly designed to work well with the figures, but to be fair, I have been able to get them into some pretty decent firing stances with it. Thwikk also comes with a repaint of the same quiver of arrows, which has a clip to attach to the brown belt so it can be worn on the hip or slung across the back if you use the belt as a shoulder strap. There’s also one loose arrow that can be loaded into the crossbow. Yeah, this line needs to learn the difference between arrows that go into bows and bolts that go into crossbows, but I guess we’ll let that slide. I was a little worried that this gear would be too cumbersome for a shorty like Thwikk, but he pulls the ensemble off quite well.

Of course, when the action draws near, Thwikk will need to resort to melee weapons and for that he has this great looking Assyrian-style Sickle Sword. The blade has a dramatic sweeping curve, ending in a clipped point and is painted in silver. The grip is red with a gold pommel and gold guard. It’s a bit flashy for this grubby little Goblin, but maybe he picked it up off the battlefield. I imagine these fellows are expert scavengers.

Thwikk also comes with this awesome turtle-shell shield, which I presume is supposed to actually be made out of a giant turtle shell. If not then maybe it’s just patterned to look like one. It’s sculpted with brown overlapping scales and has been fitted with silver painted studs, which makes it look like a formidable line of defense, and probably pretty good at offense too. The shield utilizes the newer style of grabbing handle, which can be positioned in two places to accommodate this shields other cool feature. It has a tab that allows Thwikk to wear it on his back. This is something I’ve been hoping for since the line began, so naturally I’m happy to see it incorporated.

Every time I open a new Goblin from Mythic Legions, I’m reminded why these are my new favorites. T4H have quite simply nailed this race of nasty little critters so perfectly and they add a much welcomed addition to the already diverse realm of Mythos. Thwikk doesn’t offer a whole lot that’s brand new, but instead proves again how deft T4H are at making combinations from a pool of existing parts to create something that feels new and distinctive. And I’ve had so much damn fun opening and reviewing this guy today that I think I’m going to keep the Goblin love going next week and open some more!

Mythic Legions (Siege of Bjorngar): Ogre Legion Builder by The Four Horsemen

A few days ago, another wave of Mythic Legions, Wasteland, hit my stoop. This made me very happy and then a little sad, because it made me think about how far behind I am on opening up these figures and reviewing them. Hell, I still haven’t been all the way through of Advent of Decay. Not to mention there’s another more recent Wave that will be shipping at some point and I absolutely need to get caught up before that happens. So I decided to end the week with another one of the Ogres introduced in the Siege at Bjorngar assortment. This time I’m opening up the Ogre Legion Builder! Also, I experimented with a Mythic Legions specific backdrop for this review and I’m still on the fence as to whether or not to keep going with it.

The Ogres are a new class of figures in Mythic Legions and I’ll refer you back to KKurzog, the first one I reviewed, if you need to get caught up. As we saw last time, these big bruisers come in window boxes, which are much smaller than the Trolls’ packaging, but still a lot bigger than your average Legions figure. Unlike the Trolls, these Ogres aren’t rotocast, so they retain all the articulation of the regular sized figures and they are quite hefty too! The packaging is collector friendly and there’s a slip of paper inside warning us to be careful when manipulating those joints for the first time. I haven’t had a problem with any of mine, but it’s obviously something that T4H were concerned about. Let’s get this big boy open and check him out.

As we should all know by now, Legion Builders aren’t specific characters, but rather meant to be the troops and grunts of Mythoss. They usually feature less paint apps than the regular figures, and if you’re made of money you can have a good time army building these guys. Usually the Legion Builders tend to be a little less expensive than the regular figures, but I can’t remember if that was the case with this Ogre or not. There are, as expected, a lot of assets here that have been reused from Kkurzog, so much so that it would be more accurate to just say this is a slightly tweaked version of that previous Ogre. Besides a brand new head sculpt, the only big differences here are the feet, Kkurzog was barefoot and this guy has heavy armored boots, and the medallion that’s laid into the belt buckle. Everything else is lifted directly from the other figure.

Now, a lot of the armor looks different, because there are absolutely no additional paint applications present. Surprisingly, the lack of paint doesn’t hurt the figure much for me, but rather gives the armor more of a utilitarian and rank-and-file appearance. You can’t be arming all them Ogres in your army in fancy-shmancy clothes and gear. That’s crazy! In short, it works well for a nameless Ogre that’s going to be wading into the fray and ripping enemy soldiers into pieces. Or one that’s just going to get his head taken off by a cannonball five minutes after the battle begins. Indeed, I think the only place where the lack of paint feels off is the pair of bones hanging down from the belt, because it just doesn’t make sense that these would be iron colored. Also note that the furry diaper is still present, which helps to make the figure feel a bit more premium.

The new head sculpt also really helps to carry the figure as a troop builder. I don’t want to call it generic, because that sounds like an insult, but it certainly works as a faceless minion. The top half of the head is encased in a crude helmet with spikes coming off the ears. There’s some lovely cuts and scrapes integrated into the sculpt and the lower portion of the face that shows through is teeming with personality. You can just catch a hint of his squished nose and the broad mouth has a pair of tusk-like teeth protruding upward from each corner. Thankfully T4H didn’t spare the paint on the head, so you get a bit of a different shade of green for the cracked lips, and the tusks are painted as well.

If you want to customize this guy to set him apart from Kkurzog, he does come with a second pair of wrist bracers. These are simple cuffs, which led me to discover that those bigger forearm bracers are removable. I didn’t pick up on that when I was reviewing Kkurzog and it’s a really nice touch. At first, I didn’t think I’d want to swap out the more intricate bracers for these cuffs, but once I got them on I discovered that these look a lot better suited for a Legion Builder than the others. I think he’ll keep them.

The Ogre Legion Builder comes with two weapons, one is the mace we already saw with Kkurzog and the other is an axe. You still get some extra handle pieces so you can customize the length of the weapons by adding or subtracting pieces of the shaft. Both weapons are straight silver with no additional paint apps, but they still look great. As with Kkurzog, the Ogre’s grips are pretty tight and it takes some effort to pry the fingers open enough to slip the weapons into his hands. I’m not sure if this will loosen up over time, but it can be chore.

The axe is the new accessory here, and I dig it a lot. It has a bit of a knightly pole arm look to it, and I can’t help but think a couple of these crossed and hanging on the castle wall would look great. And yet it isn’t so fancy that it looks out of place in this Ogre’s hands. The mace is fine, but I do believe I like this one more.

The Legion Builders have always been a luxury for me in this line. They utilize parts from the original character figures, and with less paint applications, I would probably sit these out if I was collecting this line on a budget. Unfortunately, I have no willpower and I try to go All In with Mythic Legions whenever I can. Hell, I’ve even doubled up on some previous Legion Builders. But the point is, if I was pinching pennies, I would have been perfectly fine with just getting Kkurzog and skipping this fellow, as he is definitely the superior figure. But that’s not to say I’m writing this Ogre off. He looks great standing beside Kkurzog and waiting for a command to go thump somebody. And dare I say, I wouldn’t mind grabbing one more of these guys, but given the added cost of these large Ogres, I don’t think that’s likely to happen.

Mythic Legions (Advent of Decay): Orc Legion Builder 2 by The Four Horsemen

Well, ain’t this a kick in the head… I actually made it through the week with three updates! I had a ton of options for content today, but in the end I just went into the Toy Closet and decided to open the first thing that hit me in the head from the toppling piles of shame. And it’s from Mythic Legions! You can never go wrong with Mythic Legions! This time I’m going all the way back to the Advent of Decay Series to check out Orc Legion Builder 2! At this point we’ve seen the packaging a hundred times, so let’s just jump right into the figure.

The original Orc Legion Builder was the last figure from the original Kickstarter that I reviewed back in 2016. This new version makes use of the new female parts from Advent of Decay to give us an Orc Femme Fatale. No, she’s not the first She-Orc I’ve reviewed here. That honor goes to Queen Urkzaa, and we’ll see some of those same parts used here. The left arm is almost identical to Urkzaa’s, being bare from the shoulder to the elbow and featuring the same grieve. The key difference here is this figure is wearing a full gauntlet as opposed to having a bare hand. The right arm breaks up the symmetry by being completely encased in armor and features a pauldron as well. Yup, OLB-2 only comes with the one Pauldron. The belt and groin armor are the same as Urkzaa’s, but this new Lady Orc includes plated hip armor attached to it. The legs are identical to Urkzaa’s down to the ankles. They’re bare down to the knee armor and in this case armored all the way down to her toes, whereas Urkzaa had bare feet. The biggest difference is in the chest armor, where Urkzaa made due with a simple armored bikini top and OLB-2 has full plate up there, exposing only her midriff.

Of course, the Legion Builders are slightly less expensive figures than the regular releases and that means they tend to have fewer paint apps and flourish. Still, what’s here is great. I love the shade of green they use for Orc flesh and, as always, I really dig the crude and jagged look of the Orc armor. The paintwork gives it a worn and weathered appearance, slightly darker than Urzkaa’s. The decision to include only one pauldron allows for the large sword to be worn on the back instead of the waist, which doesn’t work well with two pauldrons. Plus, it fits the look of the armored sleeve better. Still, it would have been nice to get a second, seeing as how this is a Legion Builder and meant to be kitted out as army builders. That second Pauldron would have allowed for a little more variety when displaying multiples. But hey, I’m not going to hold that against her.

The head sculpt features a smooth helmet that extends over the eyes and the bridge of her nose with cheek guards sweeping forward to points. There’s a pointed ridge that runs across the top like a mohawk and the eye slits are completely blacked out with no visible eyes behind them. The lower portion of the face is exposed showing a determined mouth with two tusk-like teeth protruding up from the lower jaw. She has pointed ears and a ponytail spills out the back of the helmet. resembling a horse tail. I’m assuming that’s intended to be her hair, but I suppose it could devised as something added to the helmet for ornamentation purposes.

When it comes to weapons, Orc Legion Builder 2’s arsenal is a total throwback to the original Kickstarter accessories. The sword is the two-hander with the slightly leaf-shaped blade that we’ve seen over and over again. And hey, I can’t deny that I still like this sword a lot. Many of the Legion Builders’ weapons are just one color, but this one is silver with a yellowish wash to make it look a little rusty.

Next up, it’s the familiar old battle axe. This is actually the exact same axe that came with the first Orc Legion Builder only now in silver with the same yellowish wash as the sword. Previously, this axe often included an axtra blade so you can change it from single to double-bladed. That’s not the case here. Again, I get it that these are the less expensive figures, but it would be nice to have more display options for army builders.

And finally, yup you probably guessed it, it’s the spear. At this point, I probably have more of these spears than any other accessory in the history of my collecting. There’s nothing wrong with it, but I’m ready for something else to take its place. This weapon is painted to match the others, so once again it’s all silver with a yellow wash.

I love this figure, and I actually wish I my budget would have allowed me to pick up one more. Mixing her up with the male Orc Legion Builder grants some nice diversity to my Orc army’s ranks. But obviously my big complaint here is the tired selection of weapons. We’ve seen these so many times now, and Advent of Decay introduced so many new ones. I would have liked to get at least one of the new ones with this figure. Some of the newer crude-looking weapons have been so underused and they would have been most welcome bundled with this figure.

Mythic Legions (Siege of Bjorngar): KKurzog by The Four Horsemen

It must be a Christmas miracle, because it’s Friday and I actually made it back with a third day of content this week! Can I keep it going? Probably not, but I’ll just bask in the achievement while I can. And since it’s been a few weeks since I last checked in with Mythic Legions, let’s have a look at another release in the Siege of Bjorngar assortment. Afterall, there’s a new assortment headed to us early next year and I went All In on that one, so I better work on getting caught up. Send in the Ogres!

Kkurzog is indeed one of the Ogres, a brand new figure class for Mythic Legions. They’re not as big and menacing as The Trolls, but they’re still a lot bigger than your average resident of Mythoss. I guess you could call them inbetweens! The Ogres are scaled to be about nine feet tall and billed as a mongrel mix of Orcs and Goblins, and I do not want to even think about what that consummation looks like. Nevertheless, these fellas look like they can probably turn the tide of battle pretty quickly in favor of whoever is holding their leash. They also come in a new style of packaging, which consists of a handsome and collector friendly window box, which is kind of like a smaller version of the Troll packages. Siege introduced three of these big guys to the mix and Kkurzog is the one I decided to open first.

Obviously, Mythic Legions is a line that revels in recycling parts, but Kkurzog is a brand new figure from head to toe, and unlike the rotocast Trolls, he retains all the normal articulation and structure of the regular releases. As a result, he’s a hefty bastard with a satisfying feel, and your average Legions figure doesn’t even come up to his shoulders. Nonetheless, the body parts keep the feel of previous figures with much of the body feeling like just a blown up version of the Orcs. And that’s not a bad thing. Kkurzog shows a lot of green Ogre flesh, which features a some amazing musculature in the sculpt and some gradations of green that bring out the detail. As for his outfit, what little there is of it consists of an elaborate belt and skirt. The belt features a large circular medallion on the front with a stylized, grim skull motif sculpted in. The skirt features flaps of soft plastic made to look like leather, each with bronze painted medallions, two bones hanging down the front, and a furry diaper beneath it all made out of actual fur. Above that he has a Y-style chest harness, with another ornamental medallion in the middle and sculpted plates with studs running along the shoulder straps. As always, the paint here is excellent, with individual rivets painted silver.

His lower legs and forearms are encased in plate armor, which shares the same crude and jagged pattern as we’ve seen on many of the Orc figures. The sculpt features some lovely pitting, which when paired with the grimy paint makes it look just like well-weathered iron. Once again, the paint details here are great, from the individual silver rivets to the leathery brown on the sculpted straps and copper buckles. Both the arm and leg armor also include bone hooks (or teeth?) embedded into them to add an extra surprise to any enemy who dares get too close. I also dig the sculpts on his feet, which look a bit like the bigger Troll feet. All I know is if I had to go up against one of these guys, the first thing I’m doing is going for those pinky toes with my axe. I’m pretty sure those are his weak spots.

T4H are adept at designing and sculpting some amazing creature portraits, and this head sculpt is a great example of that. While this fellow is billed as a mixing of Orc and Goblin, I’d say his mug looks like a mix of Orc and Troll. The broader and flatter nose, the beady far set eyes, and those exaggerated tusks protruding from his lower jaw all conspire to give him a fierce visage.

Despite the all new and bigger body, Kkurzog features the same articulation that we’ve seen in the regular Mythic Legions figures and that means a lot of pegged ball joints. The result is an all around well articulated figure that’s a lot of fun to play with. Sure, double hinges in the elbows and knees would have given him some more range of motion, but those types of joints don’t fit the modular nature of this line, and I’m OK with that. I’ll point out that T4H included some notes with these figures warning to be careful when first manipulating the joints, because they could snap. Personally, I’ve never had a break yet, and I’ve had just a few examples of stuck joints in all my dealings with this line. With that being said, most of the hinges are painted over, so that first manipulation can be stiff, and it usually does involve the paint peeling off the hinges. It’s expected, and the bare plastic underneath is usually colored to make up for that.

If there’s one aspect of this amazing figure that’s a little underwhelming, that would be his arsenal of weapons. Or in this case weapon. He comes with a vicious looking mace and a shaft that can be broken down or built up using various pieces. As a result, you can create a long polearm or a short one-handed head crusher. Now don’t get me wrong, the weapon is a beautiful sculpt and adding options for the shaft is a great touch, but I would have liked a few more items. Maybe T4H will release an Ogre Weapons Pack down the road a bit and I’d be all for that. I could see these guys arming with some kind of crude hide-covered shields and wielding large cleaver weapons. What we got is fine, but I just wanted a little more.

There’s so many things to love about Mythic Legions, but one of the coolest things is the way T4H have been evolving it over the years. The line started with a rich mix of Humans, Dwarves, Orcs, and Skeletons and has since given us Elves, Goblins, Trolls, Ogres. And let’s not forget that horses are coming up next. It’s a line that continues to expand the shapes and sizes of its figures and I think that has a lot to do with its continued staying power and popularity with collectors. The Ogres are just another fine example of that, and I’m looking forward to digging in to the other two, if not before the year’s end, than very soon after.

Mythic Legions: Carpathias by The Four Horsemen

Oh boy, do I miss Mythic Legions Wednesdays! The whole hiatus thing really threw a monkey-wrench into my progress through the Advent of Decay series. And as long as that’s the case, today I’m going to skip back in time to the original Mythic Legions Kickstarter to check out a figure that I passed on the first time around and have been regretting it ever since… The Vampire Carpathias!

Cutting figures from the first Kickstarter to meet my budget was a sad thing. But that should be obvious seeing as I had to let Carpathias go. Of all the figures that had to be culled for the sake of budget, I think this guy hit the hardest. And it only got worse when Advent of Decay came a long and gave us even more vampires. Fortunately, we got a second chance at some of those figures with the All-Stars pre-order and I was finally able to remedy that terrible mistake. Let’s check him out!

Like many of the armored warriors of the initial assortment, Carpathias’ armor mixes up the body parts we first saw used on Sir Gideon and Gorgo. In this case, his arms, torso, and gorget are Gorgo’s, and the legs, belt, hip armor, and lower sash are from Geoffrey. And just so that the top half isn’t all from one figure and the bottom from another, Carpathias wears Sir Geoffrey’s shoulder armor. In addition to the simple kit-bashing, the armor is given a fresh coat of paint with a black base and lovely purple accents, and the two make for an absolutely gorgeous deco. The whole thing is topped off with some meticulous silver paint detailing on the buckles and rivets. I can’t express how much I love the look of this armor. They should have sent a poet. A vampire poet. I just don’t have the right words.

And that brings us to this goddamn glorious head sculpt. The vampires of Mythoss are a loving nod back to The Nosferatu, only a lot uglier. The bald pate is flanked by two super long and pointed ears. The brow ridge is a crinkled knot, the eyes are milky and without pupils, the nose is straight off a bat, and the mouth is gruesomely distorted to make room for those yellowed central fangs. I think I’m safe in declaring that this work of art is my favorite depiction of a vampire ever.

Despite Carpathias’ unholy heritage, his weapons are actually pretty standard stuff. He comes with the standard cruciform-style broadsword we’ve seen issued with many of the knights and a stout dagger with a nearly matching wheel pommel. Both weapons have silver blades and hilts, with black grips. Of course, you also get the ubiquitous brown sword belt. These are all great looking weapons, and I’m a big fan of their generic utilitarian design.

Carpathias also comes with the spear we’ve seen so many times before. This one is painted all in silver. Unlike the sword and dagger, this one is growing a little less welcome these days. It’s a decent enough weapon, but we’ve seen it so many times, and I really prefer when they paint the shaft brown.

There were times when I considered paying scalper prices for this guy on Ebay, and those urges got even stronger once I got the vampires from Advent of Decay. Luckily T4H did the All-Stars sale and I was able to get him without dropping all that extra cash. Although now that I have him in hand, I think it still would have been money well spent. The Vampire faction has become one of my favorite races of Mythoss and Carpathias looks damn nice when flanked by a couple of the Vampire Legion Builders or conferring on courtly matters with Lucretia. And I’m happy to report that I still have one more Vampire from Advent of Decay to open. It probably won’t be the next one I review, but it’ll be coming up eventually!

Mythic Legions (Soul Spiller): Ice Troll by The Four Horsemen

[Edit] If you stopped by yesterday, then you were treated to a half-baked version of this review, because I expected to have it done by yesterday and completely forgot that it was scheduled to go live so early. Rather than pull it down, I did a quick edit and left it up, mainly because it forced me to knuckle down last night and finally finish the thing. I’ll admit it was all more than a bit unprofessional, but then when have I ever claimed to be anything but? Anywhoooo… with explanations out of the way, here’s the finished review… 

Some of you may remember, back before my great personal cataclysm, I was working my way through the Mythic Legions Advent of Decay series. I’ve still got plenty more of those figures to look at, but today I’m vaulting over Advent of Decay and headed straight for the newest assortment of Mythic Legions. Or at least the newest one to ship! Soul Spiller was a pretty small assortment and it came at a time when I was really strapped for cash, ironically a lot of that had to do with all the money I blew on Advent of Decay. Don’t get me wrong, I love all the enthusiasm that T4H is pumping into this line, but it’s squeezing my finances rather fiercely. It’s like having my financial nuts in a vice. In the end, I was only able to pick up two figures from Soul Spiller, and as you already know, one of them was another goddamn troll!

And here he is in the satisfyingly large window box! This is my third troll from Mythic Legions, although four have now been released (Forest, Stone, Arena, and now Ice). And yes, I will probably carry the bitterness of not getting the Forest Troll all the way to my grave. The box is nearly identical to the previous ones, with the main difference being the character art on the side panel. There are plenty of twisty-ties to deal with in order to get Frosty out, but if you are careful, the box is totally collector friendly, and I do indeed keep each of my Trolls in their respective boxes because I don’t currently have the space to display them. Anyway, let’s get this blizzardy bruiser out of his box and check him out!

The previous Trolls all shared the same body, and so here I was expecting another repaint from the neck down and that’s exactly what we got! This was no doubt an expensive piece of tooling for T4H and it’s only natural that they cash in and try to get as many gold pieces out of it as they can. And I understand that some collectors may not be as lenient toward reuse when buying a figure this expensive. I’d even concede that they maybe could have sculpted some parts separately to allow for some differences in sculpt. But in the end, I know what I’m getting into when I buy each of these, so I’m not going to complain about it.

Obviously, this big guy relies heavily on the coloring to make him pass for a frosty Troll, and I have to say the coloring here is quite nice. The skin is a very light blue with some white wash to give him a distinctive snow and ice flavor. As with the other Trolls, the wash helps bring out some of the beautiful details in this sculpt, from the sinews and veins in the arms to the glossy finger and toenails. I’m still suitably impressed by the detail on display, even after buying this body three times now. Granted, some aspects of the sculpt work better here than others. I think the jagged scales on the arms and legs work well for an Ice Troll, as do the crevices, which resemble cracked ice. while the stony plates on the shoulders and back, not so much. Maybe if this was the first Troll released, they wouldn’t stand out so much, but by now they really do look like bits of stone that are far better suited for his Forest and Stone cousins. Yeah, I’m kind of nit-picking here.

The sculpted belt and bracelets look as great as ever, thanks to the hammered finish in the sculpt and the tarnished coloring. I still love how the Troll’s belly is sculpted to hang down over the belt, partially obscuring it. Still, these are parts which maybe could have been sculpted separately to allow for new versions for each troll. For a line that is so masterful at mixing and matching parts to create new figures, I think this is the one real opportunity T4H missed with these guys. But those kind of changes may not be possible when rotoscoping.

Of course, all the new sculpting went into this big fella’s noggin, and I have to say, this is a glorious head sculpt. It’s part Troll, part Abominable Snowman, and part TaunTaun. There’s just enough similarities in those beady deep-set eyes to allow me to see the resemblance between him and the Stone Troll. And man, those eyes are creepy. The white peepers framed in bloody red sockets give him an Evil Dead Deadite kind of feel, and that ain’t a bad thing. The ears here are longer and and swept back, almost like an angry cat and the wrinkled forehead shows a deep battle scar running up from the right eye. The bushy white beard is framed by the two TaunTaun horns, one of which is cracked at the tip to further show that this guy has seen some action. I actually thought that was damage to my figure, before I looked more closely at it. Sadly, the jaw is not articulated, but it is partially open to show both sets of horrible looking teeth and the glossy paint inside makes his maw look suitably wet and realistic.

And yes, these guys are big. So big, I’d be remiss if I didn’t toss in a comparison shot to show just how much these Trolls tower over the regular Mythic Legions figures, so here’s a shot of him with fellow Soul Spiller release, Thallyn Frostbow. Yeah, I don’t usually include figures that I haven’t reviewed yet, but I’ll be getting to her shortly.

And with the same body comes the same articulation. These Trolls aren’t what I would call super-articulated, but there’s enough here to allow me to have plenty of fun. And because he uses the same body, the articulation here is identical to the previous Trolls. You get rotating hinges in the shoulders and elbows, as well as swivels in the hips, ankles and wrists. The neck also has a swivel, but because of the way he’s hunched over it allows the Ice Troll to tilt his head from side to side, rather than actually rotate it left and right. All in all, you aren’t getting a super articulated beast here, but the points of articulation are solid and useful, and strong ratchets in the shoulders mean that he can hold aloft his gigantic weapon, which in itself is no small feat. So let’s take a look at that weapon.

Besides the heads, the other unique feature of each Troll has been their massive weapons, and this time we get a real cool ice sword. This unique weapon features a heavy hilt with some chunky decorations and painted to look like it’s fashioned from ancient iron. The translucent ice blade protrudes from the hilt and swells near the tip. It’s far more sophisticated than the brutish weapons we’ve seen with the previous Trolls, but I still dig it a hell of a lot. The blade is a beautiful effect and it actually comes separate from the hilt.

The Ice Troll is undoubtedly the most colorful and most strikingly beautiful so far. Is it my favorite? Mmm… I think I have to grant that title to the Arena Troll. It’s nothing against Frosty here, but I just have a thing for giant Cyclops. But that’s not to take anything away from this guy. I love the coloring on him, and the head sculpt is absolutely fantastic, and for the most part I think the body sculpt still works fine for this flavor of troll. Toss in a super cool weapon (pun intended) and you’ve got another fantastic addition to the Mythic Legions line-up. I just adore these guys, and if T4H decide to churn out another on this body, I’ll probably be among the first jumping in on that pre-order.

Grimm Fairy Tales: Sela Mathers (Snow White) Bishoujo Statue by Zenescope

Does anybody love Zenescope more than I do? I dunno, maybe. But the fact is that I love them a whole lot. When Marvel’s comics started seriously disappointing me, I started spreading my comic monies around to some of the indies and Zenescope took a lot of it. The only problem? Zenescope doesn’t have a lot of support in the way of merchandizing and that’s especially the case when it comes to statues and action figures. Well, obviously Zenescope saw the problem and answered it by Kickstarting a Bishoujo-style statue of their former leading lady, Sela Mathers as Snow White. If you’ve seen some of my Kotobukiya reviews, than you probably know what a Bishoujo Statue is. And it’s clear that Zenescope’s Kickstarter set out to imitate Koto’s Bishoujo formula as much as possible. So, how’d they do? Let’s find out…

Well, for starters I really dig the packaging! Sela comes in a colorful window box, and while it lacks the side and top windows that Koto employs on its boxes, this set up still looks nice. The statue itself is held between two clear plastic trays and you can get a pretty good look at her while she’s still boxed. And because everything is collector friendly, you can feel free to display her in or out of the box. As far as set up is concerned, Sela comes already mounted on the base, so all you have to do is put her sword in her hand and her glasses on her nose. Yeah, don’t forget the glasses. Mine were rattling around in the bottom of the tray after I opened her, and they’re probably pretty easy to lose when removing the statue for the first time. They do, however, slide into place pretty easily and stay on fairly well.

And here she is! I think the composition here is really close to perfect. It’s not only iconic for the character, but it succeeds in creating an image ripped from a cover page of the prolific comic. Sela assumes a wide stance with her left hip tossed to the side, her famous book of Grimm Fairy Tales clutched in her left arm and her right arm holding her sword behind her. If I were to nitpick anything here it would be that the book be positioned just a little lower so that it wasn’t obscuring the lower half of her face from certain angles. And that is indeed just a nitpick. Truth be told, I think they did a fantastic job designing this piece.

Equally impressive is the sculpting that not only defines Sela’s lovely form, but recreates her costume as Snow White. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing terribly intricate on display here, but what’s here does a fine job. The high heeled boots include sculpted laces running up the fronts, as well as some creasing here and there. The edges of her stockings are sculpted around her thighs, her short shorts feature some simple stitch lines as well as lacing on both hips of her shorts, the half-top has a sculpted, decorative border running around the top and the whole costume is rounded out by the bracers on her biceps and forearms. As for the coloring, it’s pretty solid, but some of the paintwork could have been sharper. The white paint on the all the lacing is fine, but there’s a little bit of slop along the gold border of her top. I’ll also note here that the skin tone has a bit of a waxy finish to it, which just just happens to be one of my pet peeves when it comes to PVC statues. It’s often one of those things that tends to separate more quality pieces from knock-offs. Does it bother me here? Yeah it kind of does. Is it enough to ruin the statue? Certainly not.

The portrait is every bit as good as the rest of the sculpting. It’s definitely Sela only filtered through the Bishoujo style. It works really well for the character and I think the likeness is close enough that even Grimm fans who aren’t into the Bishoujo aesthetic could overlook it and still enjoy this figure. The paintwork for the eyes and lips are both sharp and the glasses look great, even without any plastic for the lenses. The hair sculpt is extremely ambitious and for the most part I think it succeeds. However, it does break down a bit under close scrutiny, as some of the edges aren’t as sharp as they could have been and there’s a bit of what I presume is mold flashing here and there.

As mentioned, in her right hand, Sela holds her sword, Lysraseri, forged from four of the most powerful swords in all the Realms of Power. And this is indeed a beautiful recreation of the sword from the gold and silver finish, right down to the four gems in the hilt, representing the powers of Excalibur, Chrysaor, Mistilteinn, and Kusanagi. It also fits perfectly in her hand.

The book is also very well done. It has some gold decorations printed on the front as well as the title on both the front cover and the spine, with a bookmark peeking out the bottom of the pages. Unlike the sword, the book is permanently attached to the figure’s hand.

And our final stop on this figure is the base, which is a simple black disc. It’s exactly the kind of thing I’d expect to see on a Prize Figure, and even some of Koto’s own Bishoujo’s have gone with this utilitarian look. It’s functional, it works fine, and it doesn’t detract from the figure. There were also a number of bonuses added to the Kickstarter as Stretch Goals. As I recall, some were included free while others were Add On purchases. Here are some of the goodies that I got with her…

The coolest item was the Kickstarter Exclusive comic featuring the concept art on the cover. She also came with the same comic with a Sketch Cover, which I didn’t photograph because, well… it’s just a blank Sketch Cover.

The other bonuses included a Collector’s Pin with the same artwork on it, two metal Collector Cards, and a sticker.

The Buy In to get the Statue as part of the Kickstarter was $70 if you got in on the Early Bird pricing, which is right about average for a Kotobukiya Bishoujo figure, or at least it was until recently when those prices started jumping up. Is the quality here the same as on a Koto figure? Nope, not even close. But that doesn’t mean it’s a bad figure. Indeed, for a first try, I think Sela turned out pretty well and while there were some production pictures during the course of the Kickstarter that made me a little worried, I’m quite pleased with the final product. Maybe I’m being a little extra forgiving because Zenescope figures are such rare occurrences, but what I do know is that if the teaser on the back of the box is true, I’ll be the first in line to pledge for a Robyn Hood Bishoujo.

Mythic Legions (Advent of Decay): Queen Urkzaa by The Four Horsemen

Today’s review falls into the better late than never category. I chipped away at it between hospital visits and family crisis, and managed to just wrap it up this evening. If there was ever a great example of how toys are therapy to help me get through impossible situations, this week has been it. So, what’s on today’s agenda? Orcs!!! The Orcs were a big part of previous waves of Mythic Legions, but they got the short stick when it comes to Advent of Decay. Hey, I get it. T4H had a lot of new races and factions to introduce, so it was only natural that some previous ones had to take the bench and sit most of this one out. That’s not to say the Orcs were completely absent from this assortment and today I’m checking out one of their few appearances in the Advent of Decay. And it’s none other than Queen Urkzaa, the ruler of the Orc Nation!

We’ve already seen these scantily clad female parts several times, not to mention in a variety of different skin colors, but here we’re seeing it in green for the first time. Urkzaa’s body is actually a pretty close match to the Demoness Xarria, as she shares a lot of that wonderfully crude and jagged armor that works so well with Orcs and Demons. The breast armor, the forearms, the knees, and the grieves are all the same. The waist armor is also the same, but here it lacks the hip armor and trades the front sash for a swatch of segmented plate. Urzkaa also borrows Herra Serpenspire’s bare feet. And here’s a fun fact, she’s one of the very few figures in the Mythic Legions line up to not come with any shoulder armor pieces.

Obviously, the Orcs don’t stand on ceremony, because despite being a Queen Urzkaa doesn’t cut a very regal appearance. Instead, she looks more like a savage warrior, and she even wears less than her fellow Orc generals and soldiers. T4H have used a few different shades of green to convey Orc flesh and I like that little hint of variety. Urzkaa’s skin leans a little toward the brighter side of green with some nice shading, and even some paint hits on her fingernails and toenails. The paint on the armor looks as great as ever. The gray wash mixes beautifully with the rough pitting in the sculpt to make it look well-worn and battle weathered. From the neck down, there’s absolutely nothing to suggest that Urzkaa is the ruler of the Orc Nation.

The portrait is all business! Urzkaa still manages to be a cutie even with those massive fangs growing up out of the bottom of her jaw. Some added ridges to her nose and brow gives her that not-quite-human appearance, and her almond shaped eyes are yellow and pupil-less. Is that a little mascara I see? The hair sculpt features two bundles of banded hair, each falling in front of one of her pointed ears. The rest of her hair is funneled through a headdress that I can only describe as a creature skull with an inverted jaw bone. It looks damned wicked!

As with her armor, when it comes to weapons, I guess Urzkaa believes less is more. In other words, she doesn’t come with a whole lot. She also doesn’t believe in carrying a shield. With that having been said, there are a couple of interesting blades in her arsenal. The first of which is the really cool Orc sword that was introduced in one of the earlier series. This design features a really distinctive hilt the handle and cross-guard made up of curved horns or teeth, I’m not sure which. The blade is that of a sweeping scimitar with a dark gray finish and a nasty clipped point that gives it a feel of a clever. The blade itself is littered with nicks and pitting to show that it’s seen plenty of action. T4H have used this blade very sparingly throughout the line so far, so getting it here is still a real treat.

The other piece we’ve seen before is the classic spear that goes all the way back to the original Kickstarter. If you’ve been around for my Mythic Legions reviews, then you know we’ve seen this one plenty of times. It’s possibly the least interesting of all the Mythic Legions arsenal, with a chunky shaft and the point all sculpted as one piece. This one has a brown rusty finish, which looks quite unbecoming of the Orc Queen, but it still looks good in her hands.

The final weapon included here is this grizzly looking bone cutlass. If I’m not mistaken, this is the first time I’ve seen this weapon and it is a pretty evil looking piece of cutlery. It’s all sculpted from one piece of plastic and made to look like it’s constructed of fused bones, and the yellowed finish makes it look ancient.

I’m a little torn on this figure, mainly because of her bio. On the one hand, the figure itself looks amazing and I’m thrilled to be able to add her to my collection of Orcs. On the other hand, even for a savage race of warriors, as a Queen I think Urzkaa looks a bit too pedestrian. I would have liked a cape, maybe attached with those jagged shoulder pieces, or even some skull shoulders would have been cool. She’ll look great charging into battle with her fellow clan, but I feel like her design pales in comparison to the Goblin and Dwarf Kings, not to mention some of the more elaborate skeletons. I haven’t decided whether or not to toss out her bio and just consider her a female warrior, but either way I think she’s a fantastic figure.

Mythic Legions (Advent of Decay): Shadow Elf Warrior by The Four Horsemen

Obligations in my personal life are getting a bit crazy at the moment and that will be the case the next month or so. A tiny part of me is tempted to put FFZ on hiatus. Luckily, the other parts of me are reasoning that writing about toys is good therapy, so I’m pressing on with business as usual and opening another figure on this fine Mythic Legions Wednesday. I am, however, taking it easy today and going with a figure that will be pretty simple to cover, because he’s extremely similar to a figure we’ve looked at before!

Behold! The Shadow Elf Warrior! We’ve already established that there are many types of Elves in Mythoss and today we’re seeing a new kind! This fellow is kind of a Legion Builder in that he doesn’t have a character specific bio, but he does have some additional paint applications, just maybe not as much as a regular figure. Still, without looking back at my original invoice, I can’t remember if he was one of the budget figures or a regular release. Does he look familiar? He should, because he’s very nearly a straight repaint the Elf Legion Builder. The only different parts are the lower arms and lower legs, which eschew the full plate-mail armor of the previous figure with the lighter wrist bracers and leather-like boots. The rest of the figure is totally the same, even the optional shoulder armor pieces.

And yup, that even includes the head sculpt. Well, two of them to be precise. The Shadow Elf Warrior includes an open faced-helmet, showing off his inky blue skin, pupil-less eyes and long pointed ears. We’ve seen this face before with both caucasian and dark brown skin, and now we’re adding blue into the mix. I still love the contours of the helmet, which give it an organic, if not alien flavor.

The other head is the same helmet with a fully enclosed face plate that leaves just the ears exposed. This takes the same great design and just ups the cool factor by covering the face and making the portrait all the more mysterious. This head also adds a metallic blue stripe to the helmet, which I like, but it discounts the ability to make this the same character head with just the mask added. I also have to report that this particular head features the biggest paint flub I’ve had on any of my Mythic Legions figures. There’s a bit of blue chipped off the stripe and some blue splash on the mask’s left cheek. It’s disappointing, but this line still has a tremendous track record when it comes to nearly immaculate paintwork.

As the name suggests, the base coloring here is a bit subdued, but there’s plenty of flourishes to brighten things up. Much of the armor on the arms and legs is a deep brown with the cuirass and waist armor featuring a purple wash. t works well to make the armor look more like leather than plate and also contrasts nicely with the electric blue metallic paint used for the bracers and knee armor, which are clearly supposed to be plate. Similar blue is used for some of the accents on the upper legs, upper arms, exposed chain-mail, and pauldrons. Copper paint is meticulously applied to all the tiny sculpted rivets, as well as the buckles on each of the individual straps on the armor. The blue and copper mingle beautifully for the disc-shaped belt buckle, and all in all, this is another fine example of some rather unorthodox color choices turning out a striking figure.

This Elven Shadow Warrior doesn’t exactly come packed with a ton of accessories, although the extra head should count, I suppose. With that being said, he does come with the ubiquitous two-handed sword that we see over and over (and over!) again, and I’m still fine with that. Although, as much as I like it, I am starting to think that T4H maybe should have tossed one more two-handed sword design to offset the fatigue over this one being included so many times. I mean, if for some reason you don’t like this design, then you’re pretty much screwed! Personally, I think it works well with this figure, especially with the dark painted hilt, and as you can see, I like him wearing it with the belt over his shoulder and the sword slung across his back.

A shield is included, and we’ve seen this one before as well, probably most recently with the Myria Goldenbranch. I like this shield, and I don’t have a whole lot of them, so I certainly don’t mind getting it again, although I do wonder why T4H didn’t choose to include the Elf shield that they designed with more of the Elves. It’s a beautiful piece, and technically we haven’t even seen it here yet, because I haven’t yet opened the figure it comes with. I think this particular shield works well with the woodland Elves, but this Shadow Elf could have used something more exotic.

I’ve saved the best accessory for last, and that’s this large Elf axe. I don’t believe we’ve come across this one yet, and it is indeed a sexy piece of cutlery. Everything about is exotic, from the turned ebony handle to the sweeping curves of the silver blade. Even the butt of the shaft ends in a sharp bladed point. It’s large enough to be wielded with two hands, yet slender enough for one. I love this weapon!

Being more than a dozen figures into the Advent of Decay series, it’s expected to be encountering figures with lots of re-used parts. That is, after all, the very nature of this line. So, I’m fine with a figure like the Shadow Elf Warrior being more or less a repaint of a past figure, with just a few parts swapped. The new deco looks amazing and I’m continually impressed at how by just changing up the paint, T4H are able to transform parts from heavy full-plate armor to something that more resembles leather. I can happily stand this figure beside the Elf Legion Builder without the similar sculpts slapping me in the face. The axe is a great addition to the Elf arsenal, but I would have preferred the Elf shield be included instead of the round one we got. Either way, he’s another great figure to add to the collection!