Savage World (Halloween Resurrection): Michael Meyers by Funko

If you follow me on Twitter, than you know I’m doing a #HalloweenCountdown by featuring some of my past horror-themed figure reviews. I’ve also promised to pepper in some new content for the Countdown and that’s exactly what I’m doing right now with my first look at Funko’s Savage World series of 5 1/2-inch action figures. And since I’m going to check out the new Halloween flick tonight, I thought I’d kick it off with The Shape himself, Michael Meyers!

This wave of Savage World figures answers what is possibly one of the best examples of a question nobody has ever asked: What do you get when you mix the vintage Mattel Masters of the Universe style with 70’s/80’s horror film slashers? This is a concept so bewilderingly weird and yet so intriguing, I simply had to pick up this assortment. The figure comes on a very basic bubble-and-card affair and I’ll note that this version of Michael comes from Halloween: Resurrection. The best thing I can say about that mess is that at least it actually had Jamie Lee Curtis in it. Anyway, this package is most definitely not collector friendly, so let me grab a nice sharp knife and slit it open.

And here he is out of the package and all ‘roided out! The first thing I noticed once this figure was in hand was how solid it is. I was expecting these to feel like some kind of cheap rack toys (because… Funko!), but the plastic quality is actually great. Michael has traded in his jumpsuit for a medival-looking belted tunic. Actually, it looks like the tunic could have been fashioned from his more traditional jumpsuit as it’s still got the outlines of stitched pockets sculpted on the chest and the bottom is ragged enough to look like it was torn in half. The sleeves have also been torn off to display Michael’s impressive guns, and he’s got a pair of sculpted wrist bracers. Below the belt, he’s got some simple leggings with sculpted bands wrapped around his thighs and a pair of buccaneer style boots. The stitching up the back of the boots is a great little touch.

While I think the body is fine, the real high point of this figure is in the head sculpt. Funko did an excellent job recreating the white Shatner mask with great attention to detail. You get some sharp facial contours as well as some spots of wear sculpted into it. The shock of hair and the black voids he has for eyes are also both perfect. I’d almost argue that the head isn’t stylized enough to go with the body. It really is that good!

The articulation here is as basic as it gets. You get swivels in the neck, waist, and shoulders and ball joints in the hips. No one is going to get any great poses out of this guy, but there’s just enough articulation to have a little fun with him.

Meyers come with two accessories, which are two of the same kitchen knives. It’s a pretty iconic weapon for him, so I’m cool with that. What’s not so cool is that his right hand is way too big to hold either one. He can, however hold one in his left hand fairly well.

Surprisingly enough, Savage World Michael Meyers is just what I needed to hold me over until NECA can get their version from the new film onto toy shelves. Sure, this figure is goofy and it doesn’t make any sense, but I can appreciate that being part of what makes him so much fun. Plus, when I eventually get around to opening my Savage World Mortal Kombat figures, I can get some epic crossover battles going! I’m not sure what the official retail on these actually is, but I picked up Meyers here for $12.99. It’s a tad more than I wanted to spend. I think the sweet spot on these would be around ten bucks, but then I’m also pretty surprised at how good the quality is.

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Texas Chainsaw Massacre: 1:6 Scale Leatherface by McFarlane

I wanted to do a few things for Halloween week. I mean, I’m already going to watch a different favorite horror film every night this week and eat half of the bag of bite-sizes Snickers that I bought for the trick-or-treaters, but I aslo wanted to throw out some Halloween themed toy reviews. Unfortunately, I don’t have all that many horror themed figures, which kind of surprised me, since I’m such a fan of the film genre. Once upon a time I had a whole bunch of McFarlane’s horror creations, but not so much these days. So I figured, I’d just do what I can. Let’s go right for the jugular, with the biggest and most impressive horror piece I have left. McFarlane’s giant tribute to Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

I’ve had this guy for quite a few years now, so the packaging is long gone. I do remember it came in a huge window box, which I probably would have saved. But this figure, or statue if you prefer, usually gets tossed into a storage tote along with my assortment of spook-decor after Halloween is over. I tend to give McFarlane a hard time because they spent a long time trying to pass off semi-articulated statues as action figures, but this 1:6 scale Leatherface is standing proof that McFarlane new how to craft a great looking statue… er, figure… whatever.

The figure itself is simply amazing. All too often, we’re used to seeing these large scale statues turn out to be just soft, hollow rotorcast. Not Leatherface, here. He’s a hundred percent solid plastic. If I threw Leatherface at your head, it would most certainly hurt like a bastard. He’s got all the heft of a nice chainsaw. Although his shirt and apron are actually separate rubbery plastic, which you can feel come away from the core body. Every inch of this sculpt is pure love. The skin mask almost looks like it’s removable, and there are a ton of wrinkles in his shirt, apron and trousers. Even the rings on his fingers are present, and of course, Leatherface is classy enough to wear a necktie along with his mask made out of human skin. It’s just an all around freakishly great likeness. The chainsaw is pretty huge and it is fully removable from Leatherface’s hand. It’s also chock full of detail, especially around the blade and the controls on the handle.

The paint apps are nothing to sneeze at either. Granted, this isn’t a bright and cheery figure, but there’s a ton of excellent detail work. The individual stripes on his shirt are painted on, and the wash on his mask, particularly around the eye holes is fantastic. The dried blood on the chainsaw is just the icing on the gore cake. There could be some slop here and there, but truthfully, this guy is so nasty, how would you even know?

As expected with McFarlane, this figure has just a few points of articulation. His head can turn and he has swivel cuts on each arm. He’s basically designed to be holding the chainsaw aloft in one hand, although you can have it facing outward or turn it back in toward himself. I think I would have preferred him holding it in both hands, or perhaps even above his head like he’s doing his trademark chainsaw dance. But this is still a decent enough stance.

McFarlane also went all out with the backdrop. Leatherface comes with a base that is nicely sculpted and littered with bones and an old rusted skinning knife. There’s a gallows that towers above him, which comes with a couple of hooks and a winch with a real tattered looking piece of twine rope. There’s a nice delapidated wood grain texture on the gallows, and it just adds a ridiculous amount of height to this whole display. Oh yeah, the set also comes with an extra severed arm that you can place whever you like, or just save it for later to snack on.

I seem to recall Leatherface retailing for around $29.99. At least that used to be the price point of these bigger McFarlane pieces. I’m pretty sure I got this guy at Spencer Gifts during one of their post-Halloween sales and I don’t think I paid more than $15 for him. Either way, he’s well worth the money. A lot of work went into bringing this guy to life.

In retrospect, it’s funny I own this and not a big Jason or Freddy Krueger, because Leatherface is my least favorite of the Big Three of slasher horror icons. Of course, that’s probably a compliment, since I can sit back and laugh at Jason and Freddy’s antics, but the Texas Chainsawmovies are just fucked up and uncomfortable to watch. And that’s what true horror should be about. Either way, the reason I hung on to this as long as I had is because it’s just so damn impressive and no doubt an example of some of McFarlane’s finest work, before they turned into a company that now seems content to just churn out sports and Halo figures. Sigh.