Halloween II: Ultimate Michael Myers by NECA

Happy Halloween, Toyhounds! And what better way to celebrate than with a review of a Michael Myers figure, eh? I was really hoping to be able to do a look at NECA’s new Halloween Kills version of Michael, but I haven’t found it and I’m not even sure it’s officially out yet. Luckily, I was able to pluck the Halloween II version of Myers from my backlog… I mean.. I’ve been saving him for just this occasion! Yeah, that’s it!

And that’s works out well, considering yesterday was this film’s 40th Anniversary! Not to mention, that by every imaginable standard of measurement, Halloween II is an infinitely better movie than Halloween Kills. I enjoyed Kills, but when I saw it, I was digesting a 22oz steak and was well lubricated with alcohol, so I was in a very agreeable mood. But, as the direct follow up to Carpenter’s original, Halloween II was a great ride, and still has some of my favorite Myers moments. I still get chills every time he effortlessly walks through that plate glass door without even flinching. I actually did a re-watch of this flick last night and had a great time doing it. So, let me grab a few more Fun Size Snickers from the bowl by the front door and bust open this figure!

The film begins exactly where the first one ends, so we get more or less the same version of Michael for either movie. The one big difference here is the bullet holes where Loomis “SHOT HIM SIX TIMES… SIX TIMES!!!” The Shape dons his dark blue jumpsuit with all the little sculpted stitches that I’ve come to expect from NECA’s plastic tailors. And the rumples! Oh, the rumples! Someone at NECA is just a master at sculpting rumples and wrinkles in plastic clothing. He has a pair of matte black work boots, and his collar is worn up. The jumpsuit that covers the torso is cast in soft plastic and conceals the articulation there. Otherwise, you get plenty of rotating hinges, including doubles in the elbows, which is just fantastic for the stabbing!

You get a whopping three heads with this figure! The first is the standard mask and it looks amazing. This appears to be an actual mask that is permanently attached to the head, which gives the eyes a nice sense of depth, as does the way the neck of the mask sticks out over the figure’s actual neck. The texturing on the pale mask is masterfully done so as to look like vinyl and not real skin. The hair also appears to be sculpted separately, giving it a clean hairline. I really liked the look of the modern, damaged mask in Halloween Kills, but this original will always be my favorite.

The second head is the poor bastard who just happened to be out on Halloween night dressed just like Myers and wearing a similar mask. Loomis mistakes him for Myers, hounds him into the street, and a cop car plows right into him, setting him on fire. Boy, took about shit luck! This head is certainly not essential, but boy it’s a really nice bonus. The face sculpt appears to be the same, but it’s mostly left unpainted. There are no visible eyes in the eye holes, which makes it super creepy. The hair is newly sculpted to look more disheveled, and it’s painted blonde.

The final head features the bloody eyes from the end of the movie. After Myers stabs Loomis with his scalpel, Laurie Strode demonstrates an incredible degree of marksmanship by recovering a gun and putting a bullet straight into each of Michael’s peepers. Two shots and they’re both all net! There isn’t any damage to the mask at all. Wow! This appears to be the exact same sculpt as the regular head with the blood trails painted on. The eyes are still visible too, just painted red. Yeah, that bit could have been done better, but I’m not going to nitpick it. OK… let’s go to the accessories, and just like last time, we’ll go chronologically by kill!

Knife! Myers acquires this piece of kitchen cutlery early on in the film by letting himself into an old couple’s house. He then goes next door and puts it right into Alice’s chest. At this point, I own a surprising number of butcher knives in this scale, and this one actually stands out a bit. It’s got a cool serrated blade!

Claw Hammer! What happened to the kitchen knife? Who knows!?! I guess, Michael doesn’t like his act to get stale. He puts the claw end of this accessory right into the hospital security guard’s melon, and I’m pretty sure that’s the last we see of it.

Syringe! Oh boy this one makes me cringe. He sticks the syringe right into one of the hospital nurse’s temple and pumps air right into her brain. I really dig the work NECA did on this one. It’s possibly a little oversized, but I don’t think that could be helped. The transparent tube is cool, and the business end is nasty. There’s a hand that fits this accessory perfectly.

Scalpel! The final kill accessory is the scalpel he picks up, which is admittedly a pretty small and unimpressive piece. That’s not to say it isn’t a great sculpt, but you can only do so much with a scalpel. He does, however, come with a hand that is specifically designed to hold it, which is very nice. The scalpel is a must, since it’s featured in the end scene where he’s blind and slashing away at the air. That scene always gives me the willies.

The final accessory is not a weapon, but it is very much welcome! It’s the jack-o-lantern from the beginning that opens to reveal a skull inside. This is such a cool bonus accessory, and I love how meta it is. Too bad they couldn’t put a sound chip in there to play Carpenter’s chilling theme.

While NECA’s Jason releases may be a lot more prolific, I’m thrilled to have the two Michael Myers figures they released in my collection. The modern version is an excellent figure, but this one is the one that really hits the spot. I was pretty young when I saw Halloween and Halloween II for the first times and while these films are pretty tame by today’s standards, they scared the living shit out of me in ways that few films have since. And I still felt some of that impact while re-watching Halloween 2 last night. What else can be said, other than the folks at NECA clearly have a passion for these 80’s Slashers, and it comes across loud and clear in these figures.

And that brings this Halloween Horror Month to a close. It’s the first time in ten years that I attempted it, and it was a lot of fun. I hope you enjoyed it, and if you didn’t I hope you’ll be back as regular content resumes next week. Speaking of which, I am going to be at a Horror Movie Marathon today, so I’m not going to have time to complete a review for tomorrow. I will, however, be stopping by to post a little administrative business, and then I’ll be back on Wednesday to review something decidedly Un-Spooky!

Halloween III: Season of the Witch Box Set by NECA

Happy Happy Halloween, folks! Well, for tomorrow anyway! This year, I was patient enough to put something away until October so I could have a special review for the occasion. And what better item than this celebration of the twisted novelty company, Silver Shamrock from Halloween III!! It’s well known that this flick did not get a lot of love when it was released, and that’s understandable, as it was an attempt to reboot The Shape’s own franchise into an anthology series, writing him out of it. As a teenage horror hound, I was obsessed with this movie when I first caught it on cable, because it was so damn dark, demented, and batshit crazy. It’s got stolen ancient ruins, an evil corporation, killer cyborgs, and Celtic magic amplified through modern technology! It plays out like part mystery-suspense thriller and part horror film, with a dash of sci-fi thrown in for good measure. And as much as I love Michael Myers, I still enjoy Season of the Witch more than probably two-thirds of the Halloween sequels. Of course fast forward to today and the movie has grown into its own and developed a decent cult following, but that’s a given because if it didn’t we wouldn’t be talking about Halloween III merch 38 years later. And who else to bring it to us but NECA. I’m still kicking myself for not picking up their Tom Atkins Night of the Creeps figure to stand in as Dr. Dan Challis and display with these guys. Maybe I can still pick it up on Ebay. HOW MUCH!?! Well, f’ck me!!!

NECA loves to wow collectors with presentation without going too over the top, and the packaging here does indeed wow me. This set really does feel like something that could have been offered as a special Convention Exclusive. The box has an illustrated sleeve with the film’s logo on the front and the Silver Shamrock logo on the back. There are also illustrations of The Big Three masks on the side panels. Otherwise what we get here is understated and all in black.

Pull off the sleeve to reveal the box inside and you get an advertisement for Silver Shamrock masks on the back, reenacted with the figures and accessories. This looks exactly like something you would find in the pages of Fangoria magazine back in the day. There’s even an order form to clip out! The front has a window that shows you the Trick-or-Treaters, each wearing one of The Big Three masks, and their accessories all laid out. I’m not sure whether NECA considers these part of their Retro-MEGO-Inspired line, as they are fully articulated bodies wearing softgoods clothing. but the packaging and wealth of extras make these feel more like their Ultimates series to me. I guess it doesn’t really matter either way. Let’s open this thing up and we’ll start with a look at The Witch!

The Witch is the most unique of the three as he’s wearing a sort of satanic gown. The body is covered in a black robe with a jagged cut at the bottom and cuffs of the sleeves. There’s a smock-like piece that covers from his neck down to his waist. This garment has orange borders and some orange ribbons tied just below his neck. The hood is sculpted in plastic, to show that it’s part of the mask, although it could be removed if you wanted to. The tailoring on the costume is very well done and it fits the figure well. The gown is a little snug, but I can still get some decent movement out of the figure beneath it. The ribbons are a bit much, and I may wind up retying them and snipping them down a bit. I really appreciate the work NECA put into sculpting the shoes, as each figure has different style shoes as a sort of reminder that these are kids wearing Halloween costumes.

As with all of the masks in this set, The Witch is a real work of art… warts and all! The sculpt and paint are everything I expect from NECA’s craftsmanship and attention to detail. I especially like the paint around the eyes that show a bit of the kid’s face and eyes behind the mask. Yeah, technically the hood part of the mask was actually fabric in the film, but I think they went the right direction going with plastic as it’s just easier to manage. Besides, it blends pretty well with the cloth outfit.

Next up is The Skeleton, wearing a black jumpsuit with a skeleton printed on it and a pair of sneakers! This little guy looks great! This figure really emphasizes what a great idea it was to go for softgoods outfits, as the effect really does look like a kid wearing a costume.  There are a few loose threads here and there, but otherwise the tailoring on the costume is excellent and the printed bones look especially nice.

The Skeleton mask is a beautiful sculpt with some crazy attention to detail. The cracks and fissures and pitting just goes to show you that Silver Shamrock made some great looking masks. I especially like the slit in the back allowing for it to be put on over the head. All three masks have the deadly Silver Shamrock tag, made with the shavings of ancient Celtic magic stone baked right in! It’s perfect for transmitting those child-killing techno-druid-magic signals! GOD I LOVE THIS MOVIE!!! I can’t help but admire how NECA was able to get such tiny printing on that tag and still have it be readable. If I were to make a little gripe, it would be that I’m pretty sure when Dr. Challis is captured and has the mask on him you could see his eyes through the holes, but here you can’t.

And last up is the Jack O’Lantern (or is that Jack O’Lantern Witch?) and he’s always been my favorite of the three masks. I would have killed to own a replica of this one when I was a teenager. Of course, now I’m grown up and they are available, but I’ve yet to pull the trigger. Maybe someday! This costume is basically the Skeleton jumpsuit without the skeleton printed on it, but once again we get a different pair of shoes  Yeah, of all three costumes, this is kind of the laziest, but at least the kid added a hat for good measure.

Yup, the Silver Shamrock mask was just the pumpkin, but later in the movie we saw an enterprising young trick-or-treater add the witch hat, so you can go either way since the hat is removable and simply pegs into the stem on top of the mask. From behind we can see the Silver Shamrock tag, but what’s this? They cheaped out and didn’t add the slit in the back like they did on the Skeleton mask? Nope, they got it right. That slit wasn’t on this mask in the movie. I do wish they had included the pirate hat that we saw one kid wearing on top of this mask in the flick, but now I’m just getting greedy.

Each of the figures comes with their own Trick-Or-Treat bag. If we’re going by the Ad on the back of the box, Skeleton gets a fancy printed one, while the other two just get paper bags. The printed one is laminated, while the other two feel like real paper bags. It helps to crinkle them up a bit to make them look more authentic. With a little patience, they can hold them fairly well. Of course, this year, Halloween is more about tricks than treats, because when the kids gather around their TV’s to watch The Big Giveaway with their masks on, their little heads collapse into nests of snakes and bugs! Naturally, NECA included alternate heads to depict this horror!

JESUS CHRIST!!! If these aren’t pushing the limits for toys… Oh, that’s right I mean Adult Collectibles! The masks all show evidence of deteriorating with strategically placed snakes coming out of mouths and eyeholes. What’s really creepy with these is if you look close enough you can see the kids eyes behind at least one of the eyeholes. It’s grizzly stuff!

NECA also included a television with a lenticular sticker on the screen that alternates between The Magic Pumpkin and the Silver Shamrock logo. If you have a keen eye, you can see that this is a repaint of the television included with their Nightmare on Elm Street accessory set from the “Welcome to Prime Time, Bitch!” scene. I never did pick that set up, because we didn’t have any figures of the victims to display with it, but either way, this was a clever bit of recycling on NECA’s part and it’s a great looking piece. Each figure also comes with a second pair of hands made to grasp at their heads in pain as they die horribly. FUN!

If you can’t tell, I really love this set, and I appreciate NECA for giving us stuff like this. Again, we’re talking about a cult movie from nearly four decades ago, and here we are getting action figures from it. NECA is one of the very few companies out there doing this on a grand scale. I personally haven’t seen this set in a Target or a Walmart (maybe it was a little too much for them), but the point is that a lot of their similar products are hitting big box retailers and that’s a wonderful thing. With that having been said, it gives me a heavy heart that I’ve been unintentionally neglecting NECA reviews around these parts. This is my first NECA review since early July, and I was shocked to see that I’ve only had three NECA reviews this entire year. It’s not that I’m not buying the figures, but with only three reviews a week and so much to look at, NECA has sadly been overlooked lately. I’ve got to fix that, and start giving them their due!

Halloween (2018): Ultimate Laurie Strode by NECA

Earlier in the week I checked out NECA’s Ultimate Michael Myers figure, based on his appearance in the most recent film in the Halloween franchise. That release was quite special in its own way, as it marked the long overdue return of the Halloween license to NECA’s loving, and abundantly-skilled, hands. But today’s figure? Oh boy, this one is a release that was against all odds. It’s not only Laurie Strode, but it’s Laura “elderly, survivalist-wack-job, ass-kickin, and unbelievably amazing” Strode. Yeah, it’s a great time to be a horror action figure collector, my friends!

I don’t think it would be accurate to call Jamie Lee Curtis my very first celebrity crush, but she’s gotta rank in rather closely. I cut my teeth on the first two Halloween films at a shockingly young age and I’m not ashamed to admit that JLC sure made me feel all funny down there. Since then, I’ve always enjoyed her films. Fast forward to the 2018 Halloween, and her wonderful character arc just made her all the more appealing. Older, Grittier, and a total badass. One time hot Final Girl blossomed into I-Ain’t-Takin’-No-More-Shit-Granny and she has never been more awesome. We just talked about the Ultimate packaging a few days ago with my Michael Myers review, so I won’t spend any time on it here, other than to say how much I love the art on the front panel. That’s it… let’s just jump right into the figure.

Laurie comes sporting the latest offering from the Survival Chic catalog. I honestly couldn’t even remember much about what she wore in the film, but I’ll happily accept this as screen accurate because I know NECA does their homework and always has an eye for details. She’s got a pair of black trousers with stitch lines running down the sides, and partially tucked into her woodland boots. And I might add the sculpting on the laces and individually painted eyelets just shows you how much love NECA pours into these figures. Whenever I can admire details in an average, everyday costume like this, that’s how I know they are masters at their trade.

Working our way up, she’s got a thin brown belt with a knife sheath on her right hip, a dark blue t-shirt, and a jacket which makes use of the old trick of using sleeveless soft plastic and sculpting the sleeves onto the arms. Like the boots, the jacket sports all sorts of great details, from the sculpted pockets and wrinkles, to the stitch lines and carefully painted silver zipper tracks. She even has a tiny cross hanging from a chain around her neck, both of which are part of the body sculpt. The articulation here is basically the same as we saw with Myers, and yes that does include the double rotating hinges in the elbows. As some of you may know, Hasbro’s elbow articulation gender inequality in their Marvel Legends figures is a big sticking point for me, and it’s nice to see that Laurie here doesn’t take a hit just because she’s a woman.

But the gushing doesn’t stop there, because now we get to the portraits, and wow are these great. I think the likeness is instantly recognizable, although I will say I think it looks better from an angle than when viewed from dead on. If I were to nitpick, I might suggest that it could have used some more age lines, especially since these are very apparent in the art from the box. The film did not play down JLC’s age, and I really respected that about the film and the actress. But when the figure looks this good, why complain?

The secondary head looks more or less identical, with the one exception being the granny glasses. I’d argue that these are some of the best executed glasses I’ve seen in this scale. Now, did I really need a second head to display her with or without glasses? Nah, if the extra head weren’t in there, I wouldn’t have missed it. Did NECA throw it in anyway? You bet your ass they did! They cool like that. What other extras are in the box? Let’s have a look!

NECA bundled enough weapons in here to make their own Ultimate Sarah Connor jealous. She also comes with a right hand that is sculpted with a trigger finger to work with all the guns, and a left hand that is designed to cradle the long arms. The first of the guns is her Smith & Wesson Model 66. This is the one she was using for target practice in the yard. The sculpt is ridiculously well detailed for such a tiny weapon, and includes some really nice silver paint and brown paint on the grips.

Next up, we get one of my all-time favorite rifles, the Winchester Model 1873. This one really appeals to the Western lover in me, and it was great to see it make an appearance in the film and in this figure’s accessory list. Once again, you get some wonderful detail in the sculpt, and the paint includes an authentic finish to both the metal and the wood.

And finally, Laurie comes with her own boomstick, and another iconic beauty, the Mosberg 500 shotgun. This one is easily the simplest sculpt of the three firearms, but it’s still quite accurate and her left hand is sculpted to fit the pump action slider very well.

And just when you think we might be done, Laurie comes with one more weapon, and that’s this little survival knife. It fits into the sheath that hangs off the belt on her right hip and the sheath itself is a magnificent little piece of work. It features a retaining strap for the hilt, sculpted stitching, and teeny-tiny rivets, which are individually painted in silver. The kicker is that this entire thing is only visible if you peel back her jacket flap, which just goes to show you how much love NECA puts into these figures. The knife itself is very small, and Laurie comes with an extra right hand sculpted specifically to hold it with a tight grip. I dig the finish on the blade. It looks like it might be intended to be a Damascus blade.

What more can I say, other than, “HOLY HELL, WE GOT A LAURIE STRODE FIGURE!!!” What other company would take the risk of making a figure like this? I can’t think of many. And all I can say is I hope she sells well enough to justify it. NECA did a beautiful job with this one, and I consider an essential companion figure to the 2018 Michael Myers. What’s more, I’m so happy to see this license back in NECA’s hands and I’m eagerly looking forward to the classic Halloween II version of Myers that’s supposed to be shipping sometime this month. Keep them coming, NECA, and I promise to even buy versions of The Shape from the movies I hated.

Halloween (2018): Ultimate Michael Myers by NECA

Since I’ve been back to semi-regular content, I’ve been trying to spread the love around to the offerings I collect from various toy companies that are piling up on the floor of my Toy Closet. I’ve also been trying to combine some reviews when possible to help me not be so far behind. This week, I thought a return to NECA was long overdue. I’ve got tons of new NECA figures to look at, so today let’s open up the Ultimate version of Michael Myersfrom the recent 2018 film. I had originally intended this to be a dual review of both Myers and Laurie Strode, but I found that I had a fair amount to say about each of these figures, so I’m breaking it up into two reviews, which will hopefully both post this week.

I’ve been a dedicated fan of NECA’s Ultimate line, so it should come as no surprise that I was beyond excited to get this figure. As always, these Ultimate releases come in what appear to be enclosed boxes, but actually have opening front flaps to show off the figure and accessories inside. The front panel looks fantastic, there are lots of pictures of the goodies inside, and the box is collector friendly. Yup, these are some of the few figures that I keep in their boxes, not only to keep all the accessories together, but also because NECA’s Ultimates look great lined up on bookshelves. And oooh, look at that sticker! There’s a flickering pumpkin inside!!! As for the film? I really enjoyed it. I don’t think it was mind-blowing, or in any way exceptional, but it was refreshing in its simplicity, especially when you consider what a shit-show the Halloween franchise had become. It’s been a long time since I cared about these movies, and I feel that the new one set things back on a positive track. So let’s get this box open and check out The Shape!

I have to imagine that even people who didn’t care for the movie, would still have to concede that Myers never looked better. And as usual, the same can be said of NECA’s version. Granted, from the neck down, this isn’t a terribly complex or flashy sculpt, it’s a just a dude in a boiler suit, but it’s still loaded with details. You get wrinkles and rumples, pockets, stitching, and all that jazz. Exciting? Maybe not, but it sure looks great, right down to the meticulously sculpted work boots.

The high collar of the suit gives way to the iconic mask and this portrait is fabulous. The expressionless visage of the Shatner mask has chiseled creases and wear making it look as frighting as ever. As time wore on, the mask began to take on more detail, which lends itself well to the HD age of film. I also really dig the way the shock of hair is swept back and the mask ends high enough so you can see Myers’ real neck protruding from it. And then you have what might be a sticking point for some classic Halloween fans, and that’s the eyes visible through the holes in the mask. There’s some wonderful depth here that really makes the mask feel like it was layered onto the head and there’s a face sculpt under there. And let’s not forget, this is Myers as he appears in the 2018 film. A film that dared show a glimpse of Myers unmasked.

But, let’s say you don’t like the visible eyes, and you just want a pair of vacant black pools where his peepers should be? That’s right, you get an alternate head to suit your preferences. It’s actually a completely different sculpt, with subtle changes in the mask itself, and the hair is a lot less unruly. And the eyes are actually still in there, they’ve just been painted over to make them harder to see. Normally, I would prefer the blacked out eyes, but to be honest, I think the first mask just looks loads better, and it’s probably the one I will go with for the display. It’s certainly the one I went with for a majority of the pictures in this review.

The articulation here is very good, and it even holds a few surprises in the elbows. NECA is usually content with giving their figures rotating hinges in the shoulders, but Myers here has double-rotating hinges! Yeah, they’ve done this before, and it’s nice to see them doing it again. It allows for a much tighter bend in the elbow, and overall better posing. As for the rest, the shoulders are rotating hinges, and the wrists are ball jointed… or so I thought! They’re actually pegs on tiny ball joints, similar to what we get with a lot of Sixth-Scale figures these days. Not bad! The legs have rotating hinges in the hips and knees, and the ankles have hinges and lateral rockers. I’m not sure what’s hiding under the rubber boiler suit in the torso, but it does feel like there’s some movement in there. Finally, he has a ball joint in the neck. Let’s move on to the accessories!

First off, Myers comes with a modest assortment of killing tools. These include a bloody hammer, a fireplace implement, and his rather iconic butcher knife. He also comes with extra hands to help him hold each of these. Actually, you get both a right and left accessory holding hand, so he can dual wield if you like. Extra weapons are always nice, but there’s only so much I can say about these. The very iconic butcher knife is my favorite. To me, it’s as much a part of Myers, as Jason Voorhees’ machete is to him, or Leatherface’s chainsaw is to that demented freak. As for the others, the poker is very thin and frail, and I probably won’t be pulling it out much just for fear of snapping it. The hammer is great, and I appreciate the bloody paint apps, but it’s still just a tiny hammer.

Myers also comes with a left hand with two of the fingers blown off. God bless ya, NECA. You really do think of everything!

Also included in the box is the severed head of the police officer from Laurie Strode’s protection detail that Myers decapitates. And wow is this a delightfully gruesome piece of work! I’d dare say that this is one of the most grizzly accessories I’ve seen included with a horror figure. I dig how it’s been hollowed out and carved up like a Jack-O-Lantern, complete with the eyes taken out. Yup, this is pure nightmare fuel cast into plastic and lovingly painted.

Next up is the grave-marker of Judith Myers, which is a nice addition to the little collection of headstones that NECA has been giving to us with some of their Ultimate horror figures. This one is very thin and lightweight, but it looks fine, and will make a nice addition to the display when off-set behind him on the shelf.

And finally, you get the accessory that’s so damn good, they had to call it out on the package with a sticker. At first, I assumed this would be the iconic Jack-O-Lantern from the credits, but in a really nice callback, it’s actually Vicky’s pumpkin with the heart-shaped eyes and nose. You know, the one that wound up in the fishtank! The lighting effect is activated by pushing down ont he top of the pumpkin and it really is superbly done.

Who doesn’t love Halloween in August, eh? Finally seeing Michael Myers done by NECA feels so right and this is yet another Ultimates release that they knocked right out of the park. The sculpt and articulation on the figure itself are both great, and the entire package is elevated by the wonderful accessories. There’s enough here for plenty of fun, as well as some great display options. And to think, when I pre-ordered this figure, I imagined it was going to be the only Myers that we get out of NECA because of licensing issues. Of course, they have since shown off the Halloween II version of The Shape, and that one has me very excited. But hell, even if they couldn’t swing that deal, I still would have been perfectly happy with this figure representing Myers on my Slasher Shelf! And what could possibly be cooler than this? How about a figure of Laurie Strode from the 2018 movie as well? Yup, we got that too, and I hope to be back by the weekend to have a look at that figure!

Savage World (Halloween Resurrection): Michael Meyers by Funko

If you follow me on Twitter, than you know I’m doing a #HalloweenCountdown by featuring some of my past horror-themed figure reviews. I’ve also promised to pepper in some new content for the Countdown and that’s exactly what I’m doing right now with my first look at Funko’s Savage World series of 5 1/2-inch action figures. And since I’m going to check out the new Halloween flick tonight, I thought I’d kick it off with The Shape himself, Michael Meyers!

This wave of Savage World figures answers what is possibly one of the best examples of a question nobody has ever asked: What do you get when you mix the vintage Mattel Masters of the Universe style with 70’s/80’s horror film slashers? This is a concept so bewilderingly weird and yet so intriguing, I simply had to pick up this assortment. The figure comes on a very basic bubble-and-card affair and I’ll note that this version of Michael comes from Halloween: Resurrection. The best thing I can say about that mess is that at least it actually had Jamie Lee Curtis in it. Anyway, this package is most definitely not collector friendly, so let me grab a nice sharp knife and slit it open.

And here he is out of the package and all ‘roided out! The first thing I noticed once this figure was in hand was how solid it is. I was expecting these to feel like some kind of cheap rack toys (because… Funko!), but the plastic quality is actually great. Michael has traded in his jumpsuit for a medival-looking belted tunic. Actually, it looks like the tunic could have been fashioned from his more traditional jumpsuit as it’s still got the outlines of stitched pockets sculpted on the chest and the bottom is ragged enough to look like it was torn in half. The sleeves have also been torn off to display Michael’s impressive guns, and he’s got a pair of sculpted wrist bracers. Below the belt, he’s got some simple leggings with sculpted bands wrapped around his thighs and a pair of buccaneer style boots. The stitching up the back of the boots is a great little touch.

While I think the body is fine, the real high point of this figure is in the head sculpt. Funko did an excellent job recreating the white Shatner mask with great attention to detail. You get some sharp facial contours as well as some spots of wear sculpted into it. The shock of hair and the black voids he has for eyes are also both perfect. I’d almost argue that the head isn’t stylized enough to go with the body. It really is that good!

The articulation here is as basic as it gets. You get swivels in the neck, waist, and shoulders and ball joints in the hips. No one is going to get any great poses out of this guy, but there’s just enough articulation to have a little fun with him.

Meyers come with two accessories, which are two of the same kitchen knives. It’s a pretty iconic weapon for him, so I’m cool with that. What’s not so cool is that his right hand is way too big to hold either one. He can, however hold one in his left hand fairly well.

Surprisingly enough, Savage World Michael Meyers is just what I needed to hold me over until NECA can get their version from the new film onto toy shelves. Sure, this figure is goofy and it doesn’t make any sense, but I can appreciate that being part of what makes him so much fun. Plus, when I eventually get around to opening my Savage World Mortal Kombat figures, I can get some epic crossover battles going! I’m not sure what the official retail on these actually is, but I picked up Meyers here for $12.99. It’s a tad more than I wanted to spend. I think the sweet spot on these would be around ten bucks, but then I’m also pretty surprised at how good the quality is.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre: 1:6 Scale Leatherface by McFarlane

I wanted to do a few things for Halloween week. I mean, I’m already going to watch a different favorite horror film every night this week and eat half of the bag of bite-sizes Snickers that I bought for the trick-or-treaters, but I aslo wanted to throw out some Halloween themed toy reviews. Unfortunately, I don’t have all that many horror themed figures, which kind of surprised me, since I’m such a fan of the film genre. Once upon a time I had a whole bunch of McFarlane’s horror creations, but not so much these days. So I figured, I’d just do what I can. Let’s go right for the jugular, with the biggest and most impressive horror piece I have left. McFarlane’s giant tribute to Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

I’ve had this guy for quite a few years now, so the packaging is long gone. I do remember it came in a huge window box, which I probably would have saved. But this figure, or statue if you prefer, usually gets tossed into a storage tote along with my assortment of spook-decor after Halloween is over. I tend to give McFarlane a hard time because they spent a long time trying to pass off semi-articulated statues as action figures, but this 1:6 scale Leatherface is standing proof that McFarlane new how to craft a great looking statue… er, figure… whatever.

The figure itself is simply amazing. All too often, we’re used to seeing these large scale statues turn out to be just soft, hollow rotorcast. Not Leatherface, here. He’s a hundred percent solid plastic. If I threw Leatherface at your head, it would most certainly hurt like a bastard. He’s got all the heft of a nice chainsaw. Although his shirt and apron are actually separate rubbery plastic, which you can feel come away from the core body. Every inch of this sculpt is pure love. The skin mask almost looks like it’s removable, and there are a ton of wrinkles in his shirt, apron and trousers. Even the rings on his fingers are present, and of course, Leatherface is classy enough to wear a necktie along with his mask made out of human skin. It’s just an all around freakishly great likeness. The chainsaw is pretty huge and it is fully removable from Leatherface’s hand. It’s also chock full of detail, especially around the blade and the controls on the handle.

The paint apps are nothing to sneeze at either. Granted, this isn’t a bright and cheery figure, but there’s a ton of excellent detail work. The individual stripes on his shirt are painted on, and the wash on his mask, particularly around the eye holes is fantastic. The dried blood on the chainsaw is just the icing on the gore cake. There could be some slop here and there, but truthfully, this guy is so nasty, how would you even know?

As expected with McFarlane, this figure has just a few points of articulation. His head can turn and he has swivel cuts on each arm. He’s basically designed to be holding the chainsaw aloft in one hand, although you can have it facing outward or turn it back in toward himself. I think I would have preferred him holding it in both hands, or perhaps even above his head like he’s doing his trademark chainsaw dance. But this is still a decent enough stance.

McFarlane also went all out with the backdrop. Leatherface comes with a base that is nicely sculpted and littered with bones and an old rusted skinning knife. There’s a gallows that towers above him, which comes with a couple of hooks and a winch with a real tattered looking piece of twine rope. There’s a nice delapidated wood grain texture on the gallows, and it just adds a ridiculous amount of height to this whole display. Oh yeah, the set also comes with an extra severed arm that you can place whever you like, or just save it for later to snack on.

I seem to recall Leatherface retailing for around $29.99. At least that used to be the price point of these bigger McFarlane pieces. I’m pretty sure I got this guy at Spencer Gifts during one of their post-Halloween sales and I don’t think I paid more than $15 for him. Either way, he’s well worth the money. A lot of work went into bringing this guy to life.

In retrospect, it’s funny I own this and not a big Jason or Freddy Krueger, because Leatherface is my least favorite of the Big Three of slasher horror icons. Of course, that’s probably a compliment, since I can sit back and laugh at Jason and Freddy’s antics, but the Texas Chainsawmovies are just fucked up and uncomfortable to watch. And that’s what true horror should be about. Either way, the reason I hung on to this as long as I had is because it’s just so damn impressive and no doubt an example of some of McFarlane’s finest work, before they turned into a company that now seems content to just churn out sports and Halo figures. Sigh.